Teddy’s Tips for Language Learning (Part two)

This week we’re lucky to have the second part of an interview with Teddy from Teddy Nee’s Language Blog. If you missed the first one you can read it here.
Teddy is a native of Medan city, Indonesia, who loves writing as much as language learning.Teddy Pic

Great to interview you again Teddy.
What do you think is the importance of learning a foreign language?

How many people around you who know multiple languages? By the word “know”, I mean being able to hold conversation related to basic topics, such as self-introduction or expressing oneself. Have you ever asked them about their language learning story?
I used to question myself, “What motivates someone to learn foreign languages when many people already know English, which they might have learnt for years from school?”
Although English has been used in major international activities, not everyone speaks English. Many people know English, but not everyone speaks it well.
Let’s say a Korean meets a German, they might speak English with their accents, which could be difficult to be understood by each other. Moreover, things might be worse when they speak English with their own mindset. Imagine one is speaking indirectly meanwhile the other is the opposite, despite speaking the same language, they might not have common understanding.

Could you tell our readers which languages you have learned so far?

How do you start learning a new language?
Before learning a language, I usually begin by reading the country profile, including its language and the culture of the people. Afterwards, I would read travel phrases or play with words. I believe that when you learn a language, you don’t learn only about the grammatical structure or words, but you also learn about its culture. You learn about what makes the language alive and being used over centuries.
Many people learn foreign languages nowadays, making foreign languages part of our life. The Internet has abundant of learning resources, articles, or even free/ paid courses, but many people still cannot learn successfully. Imagine that you are still hungry despite having many plates of food served on your table. Something is wrong!
When a student don’t excel at school, parents cannot blame solely at teachers, or cannot even blame the teachers. It is always better to be an independent learner, as we know ourselves better than anyone else.
Which languages do you suggest to people to learn?
I once read that English, German, French, Spanish, and Chinese Mandarin are considered five important languages for business. Well, you might argue with me about the data accuracy, and I am totally fine with that since everyone might come up with their own conclusion about which language being the important.
However, I strongly agree that Western European languages, such as German, Spanish, Portuguese, or French, and East Asian languages, such as Korean, Japanese, or Chinese Mandarin, are favorited languages for many learners.
You can see from the mentioned set of languages that many of them come from the same language family. One advantage of learning one of them is that it enables you to understand to some degree other languages from the same family, even without learning them. For example, Portuguese speakers will understand Spanish easier than Dutch.

Thanks for sharing your ideas Teddy. Your love of languages is infectious.

If you’d like to hear more from Teddy check out Teddy Nee’s Language Blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available