How to prepare for life as new parent with a Disability.

Parenting is never easy, but having long term illness or disabilty can make it even more challenging. This inspirational couple have used their own experiences to help others in their position.

Ashley Taylor is a disabled mother of two wonderful, amazing, energetic children. She met her husband, Tom, while doing physical therapy. Tom had suffered a spinal cord injury due to a car accident and uses a wheelchair for mobility. Ashley and Tom knew they wanted children and knew they would have to adapt their lives and home in order to make this dream come true. Ashley is happy to say that they are the proud parents of two healthy, wonderful children and their disabilities haven’t stopped them from leading a happy, fulfilling life. She created DisabledParents.org to provide information and resources to other parents with disabilities.

Having a disability doesn’t mean you need to live your life with limitations — that includes the desire to have children. Rather, it’s about making the necessary modifications to your home and lifestyle in order to create a safe and stress-free environment for you and your family. With careful planning and being aware of available resources, raising a child while taking care of your health doesn’t have to feel like an overwhelming experience.

Make Home Modifications

Modifying your home to meet the needs of an ability as well as a child can be expensive, but there are plenty of grants available that can help fund crucial changes. Many resources specialize in everything from vertical stair lifts and wheelchair ramps to bed and bathroom safety bars to speciality doorknobs and handles. These modifications are crucial for the safety and mental health of the disabled parent, as well as any children living under the same roof. Note that if you rent versus own, it’s the responsibility of the landlord (by law) to make the necessary modifications to your residence.

Eliminate Clutter

Clutter equates to stress and confusion, neither of which you need as a new parent with a disability. Make it a point to do inventory and organize your home before the child comes into the equation — instituting help if need be. There are specialists that can assist in areas of sorting, organization and personal planning.

Get Help

Don’t be too proud to ask for help. Look into personal assistance services (PAS), a support group for more than 13.2 million people with disabilities. PAS supporters help with everything from eating and bathing to shopping, cooking, and cleaning. Family, friends, and neighbors likely fall into an unpaid category, while formal services are typically handled by public funding, private insurance, or out-of pocket-costs. Again, utilizing free resources (outside of family and friends) should not be overlooked; it’s your right by law to receive assistance.

Self-Care To Manage Stress And Depression

Having a disability comes with its share of stress — as does being a new parent figuring out the ropes. Combine the two and you have the potential for an overwhelming situation that can lead to depression. Despite the laundry list of responsibilities you have on your plate, self-care should be a priority to cope with stress. This includes maintaining hobbies, interests, and friendships; delegating tasks; maintaining physical fitness; and acceptance — nobody is perfect. source

There are also several free resources available to parents with disabilities that offer a comprehensive overview of qualified community organizations, social service agencies, and healthcare providers.

Keep Emergency Numbers On Hand

You shouldn’t have to wait for a crisis before figuring out where you can obtain aid. Every parent should keep a list of go-to numbers to deal with situations such as accidental poisoning, childcare advice, depression, medical assistance, natural disasters, and more.

Utilize Available Resources

From transportation and employment assistance to educational and recreational opportunities, there are many resources available if you have a disability. It’s your right to receive such assistance, so don’t be afraid to utilize it. If you’re not sure where to start, ask your doctor or other medical advisor for credible resources in your area. source

Perhaps the most important message to understand as a parent with a disability is that there are several resources available to help you out that don’t include friends and family — thought it’s great if you have that network, too. Living your best personal life while being a parent and role model at the same time is a true reality. Remember that being a parent is among one of the best gifts in life, so practice acts of gratitude when you’re feeling overwhelmed. source

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Multilingual merriment in Wales

Our girls were off at camp for almost forty eight hours so we decided to have a night away just me and Mr.Lingotastic. We decided to go to Chepstow as it was a pretty looking town.

Being the obsessive linguists we are we, thought it was a chance to practice and improve our Welsh. On the way to Wales our soundtrack was a Welsh songs playlist which was a really interesting mix of beautiful harpy Celtic sounding songs and “fields of gold” in Welsh.

As we arrived in Wales we remembered how much road sign Welsh we remembered. As we saw Welsh on signs we realised lots of common words

Bont bridge pont
Ffenestr window fenêtre
Eglwys church église
Ysgol school école

I suppose if you are linguistically minded you are always looking out for words from languages you know to make sense of other languages. Loving languages as we do we are always listening out for other languages.

Looking for somewhere to eat, we found the most lovely Greek restaurant
Mythos.http://www.themythos.co.uk/
As we know a little Greek, we greeted the waitress with “Kalispéra” (good evening) and said “efcharistó” (thank you) on a few occasions.
The food was the best food we have had in a restaurant anywhere. I was able to try the famous Tiropitakia, and musaka. Maik had meatballs and an amazing spiced beef stew. The food was really simple but good authentic Greek food. We had to try the cheese pie for dessert lots of cinnamon and filo pastry.
Hubby asked for the bill in Greek (after a quick Greek recap) and she asked if he was Greek 😊 That was the greatest honour and surprise.
We heard the other waiter was Romanian so said thanks in Romanian
mulțumesc. After the initial surprise we started talking about multilingual families and encouraging him in his journey with his five year old.

We had a look around beautiful Chepstow castle the next day. As with any tourist magnet there were lots of languages to listen out for. We managed to hear five that day.The signs in the castle were both in English and Welsh. It was fun to pick out the welsh words we knew.

It was interesting from a linguistic point of view as the castle was originally Norman, which may explain the number of words Welsh and French have in common. The local language spoken in Normandy is actually fairly understandable to Welsh speaker. It is fascinating to see how the movement of people and trade influences language.

As a family who love languages we are always on the lookout for them. We would love to hear your stories.

Hydration with WUBL

It is so important to keep the kids hydrated this summer but, there is so much choice. How do help them make healthier choices? WUBL have come up with a lovely child friendly solution. We came across wubl a few weeks ago.

I love that is created by family as a solution to a problem they noticed. Here is their introduction in their words.

Hello, We’re Mark and Leigh and we’ve created WUBL!. We’re a dad and an uncle on a mission to improve children’s health by reducing the amount of sugar that they consume. This started when I realised that there wasn’t a truly 100% healthy and fun drink for my daughter Daisy and as soon as my wife said: ‘Why doesn’t anyone put water in cartons for kids?’ I told Leigh and our mission began. So we created WUBLWater, a kid’s drink that’s sugar and nasties free AND fun, with cool characters called WUBLs that children love, supported with an amazing and safe online world for kids to play in called WUBLWorld.


Mark kindly sent us a few cartons to review, so over to my chief reviewers.

Emily age 9
The WUBL spring water is good to take on school trips because it is just like a carton but just full of water. .You can take it almost anywhere,a good place I would suggest to take it is to a swimming pool also,the straw which is attached is extendible, and I think it would be suitable for younger people, because it is less spilable than a normal water bottle. .I like the design because it isn’t a normal design you would see on an every days carton. It is a bit of an an unusual picture as you can see.The WUBL water is in a carton. I also like that it is not just called water, or spring water because it would be boring, but I like the name wubl because it is fun and creative.

Jasmin aged 10
Jasmin checked out the website…
The website is good for preschoolers as the activities are easy and fun. I think at the the beginning when there is the rocket it should be more obvious that you should press the big red button because preschoolers may not know what to do. On the website there is a story, a design a world game, videos and a page for parents with videos about how they made WUBL and how they came up with the idea.
The packaging is good because it is especially designed for preschoolers so it is less spillable. I took it on a school trip to Legoland and it did not leak but my water bottle normally does. It is better than a plastic bottle as it is better for the environment also it takes up less space and is easier to open. It tastes like normal water.

Mum
We all went swimming and took the cartons of WUBL to drink after our swim. In the pretty packaging the girls were happy to drink it instead of the sweet alternatives that were available there. It was good to have that alternative available to give them.
Anyways, enough from us. Maybe your family should try wubl for themselves?

MosaLingua – More than just flashcards

We have a review from my lovely language obsessed husband, Maik.

One of the perks of attending the 2016 Polyglot Gathering in Berlin was the amazing offer from the guys at MosaLingua to give every attendee free access to their Premium Apps for learning German, French, Brazilian Portuguese, Italian and Spanish.

 

Here’s what we think of them.

 

So, for a start, the apps are available for both iOS and Android. At its core, MosaLingua uses a flashcard system with spaced repetition. That doesn’t sound like anything special you might say, plenty of apps out there that already do that, but bear with us!

 

Here are some of the elements which set MosaLingua apart at first glance:

MosaLingua dialogues

 

  • Their phrases are well chosen, and useful in actual conversations
  • You can actually study entire, authentic dialogues
  • Good quality (native speaker) audio and images with each flashcard
  • A clever rating system

 

More on that last point:

 

Rather than being simply marked as right or wrong, the user can select four levels of marking the answer (in descending order of confidence): Perfect, good, difficult and again. These ratings determine the timing and frequency of when the flashcard is next presented.

 

But going back to the beginning, MosaLingua lets you select your level when you first start in the app, giving you some brief pointers of what you should be confident with at that level. Alternatively you can take a fairly simple placement test. Based on the results, the app then personalises your learning plan, so you don’t waste your time learning/ reviewing stuff you already know.

 

The flashcards you are presented with always contain full sentences. This clearly makes them more challenging than individual words, but also a lot more useful. To help your learning, each card is also presented in different ways, i.e. a card with a full sentence in either English or the foreign language, a card where you write out the phrase, or a jumbled up sentence where you need to select the correct words in the right order.

 

MosaLingua Categories

One feature we particularly like is the “Useful Lists”, which contains the following:

  • My new cards – yes, you can actually create your own cards within the app
  • By level – all available flash cards sorted into levels of difficulty from basics to advanced and specialised
  • Ignored cards – the ones you have chosen not to learn
  • Cards to learn – cards that you want to learn (obviously)
  • Memorised cards – the ones you are in the process of memorising
  • Cards to review (exactly what it says …)

 

On top of this you can jump straight into a subject that interests you, such as Eating, Shopping or Socialising, to name just a few. And you can unlock bonus material (including jokes) as you progress – an additional reward for your learning.

 

So, to summarise: MosaLingua is not your average spaced-repetition driven flashcard app. What sets it apart is how much you as the user can customise the app for your own purposes. If you get an answer right by sheer luck, you average app would just mark it as correct and assume you’ve learnt it, whereas MosaLingua will let you say “actually that as pretty difficult and I just happened to guess right”. Add to that the ability to create your own cards and the being able to study by topic, and you have a very personalised approach to virtual flashcards.

 

Of course no flashcard app is sufficient on its own to make you fluent in a language, but MosaLingua gives you a great set of tools to build up a useful arsenal of phrases. So, we recommend you give one of their apps a go. Test drive one of the free versions, and if you like it, you can upgrade for less than £5. Let us know what you think!

 

https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=MosaLingua+Crea

https://itunes.apple.com/us/developer/mosacrea-limited/id353372463

Languages can help improve your mental health

Language Show Live

Language Show LiveIn case you have missed it (ie you live in a cave and have no access to any form of media at all, in which case, how are you reading this) It is mental health awareness week.
As a languages blogger I thought I could go one better and show how languages can help your Mental Health, so using helpful subheadings, here we go.

Languages are a great way to make friends.

I would even say, langauges are thebest way to make friends. In learning someone’s language you show your commitment to them which is a massive thing. I wrote a blog about it a while back.

I believe friendships are so fundamentally important. They can encourage you to come out of your shell in ways you could never have dreamed of before. They can help you to not only brave but embrace the world. It helps us to reconnect with a world we perhaps were at a disconnect from with a void of despondency. Friendships are so eminent to our well-being, and we need to constantly remind our friends of how much we love them (because I know I love mine).

source themighty.com why-friendships-are-fundamentally-important-to-mental-health-recovery/

Want to be a good friend to someone with mental illness?


Music is the best way to learn a language.

My favourite way to learn a language is though singing along to songs in another language.

I sing ALL the time (and sometimes drive my family mad doing so) I know that the singing has positive benefits to me. I found this actual research on it saying “After reviewing 25 trials, the researchers concluded

that music is a valid therapy to potentially reduce depression and anxiety, as well as to improve mood, self-esteem, and quality of life.”

source www.healthline.com/health-news/mental-listening-to-music-lifts-or-reinforces-mood-051713

Creativity helps language learning
You can learn languages whilst colouring with these gorgeous books. My hubby brought me them back from the Polyglot conference in Iceland.
Creativity is also good for your mental health.
I find that colouring is a great way to relax and unwind, to destress. If I feel a bit anxious it gives me something to focus on. Research has been done on this too.

“Coloring definitely has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety, create focus or bring about more mindfulness,

Groundbreaking research in 2005 proved anxiety levels dropped when subjects colored mandalas, which are round frames with geometric patterns inside. Simply doodling, though, had no effect in reducing the other subjects’ stress levels.
Just like meditation, coloring also allows us to switch off our brains from other thoughts and focus only on the moment, helping to alleviate free-floating anxiety. It can be particularly effective for people who aren’t comfortable with more creatively expressive forms of art, says Berberian, “My experience has been that those participants who are more guarded find a lot of tranquility in coloring an image. It feels safer and it creates containment around their process,” source https://edition.cnn.com/2016/01/06/health/adult-coloring-books-popularity-mental-health/index.html

Netflix and chill
Language learning can happen anywhere. Watching your favourite film or relaxing with friends.

Chilling with a film and spending time with friends are great ways to unwind
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/3daqaj/is-watching-tv-actually-a-good-way-to-rest-your-brain
To some extent, escapism is just human nature, and TV offers it up on a silver platter.

a bit of distraction can be rejuvenating, and that anything that lowers stress can be a good thing. “Television provides an escape, since we travel into a new world, we have the sense of being present in the imaginary world

source https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/3daqaj/is-watching-tv-actually-a-good-way-to-rest-your-brain


The code switching of changing languages can be used to manage emotions.

Personally, I have a very busy mind and concentrating on other languages keep my mind occupied and from overthinking. I can also find if I switch languages I can be calmer. Bilinguals often have different personalities in different languages. In bilingual families some feel that one language is more comfortable in a certain setting. Some feel more able to express certain emotions better in their second language.source
www.languageonthemove.com/do-bilinguals-express-different-emotions-in-different-languages/ In our family we always talk of Nikolaustag even in an English sentence as it is a German festival for us.


Discovering your real authentic self.

Languages help you to be you. I went along to the polyglot gathering in May last year. It was such a diverse, geeky and accepting community of people but our love of languages brought us together, meeting some of the people there from different countries, backgrounds and holding such different values made me think about my own values and what actually is important.

We tend to stifle our authentic selves to fit in without even realising it. And doing so suppresses our creativity, ingenuity, and self-awareness.

We’re all raised with a core set of beliefs, and many of those might conflict with what you believe today. These may deal with important issues like race, religion, sexuality, and more. Taking time to think about about these longstanding habits and worldviews to see if they’ve changed can be really helpful
According to some psychologists, authenticity can also lead to better coping strategies, a stronger sense of self-worth, more confidence, and a higher likelihood to follow through on goals. source https://lifehacker.com/how-to-discover-your-authentic-self-and-live-the-life-1698115144

Could you homeschool your children?

A few years ago I had to homeschool my daughter. It was a real steep learning curve for us both, but also a really fun valuable thing to do. When Maria offered me this guest blog I jumped at the chance to feature it, hoping it could provide encouragement to others. So first a bit about Maria.

Maria is part of the community outreach team at Edu Aid. Maria spent over 15 years as a primary school teacher before homeschooling her own children for a number of years. Maria is passionate about ongoing education at all ages, and when isn’t learning new things is a keen walker and cyclist and can be found exploring.

As a parent you may be thinking of tutoring your own child. You might want to tutor your child in a specific subject (such as Math or English) because your child is battling in this subject area. Alternatively you may wish to homeschool your child. You might worry that by tutoring your child you will be changing your relationship with him or her. You may feel anxious about taking on a new role. You may ask yourself how you find the key to successfully tutoring your own children?

Don’t be afraid of taking on the role
Marina Koestler, in her book on tutoring, shares that parents are a child’s best tutor. As a parent you have always showed your child how to cope or manage new tasks. You showed your child how to tie a shoelace, and how to dress or bathe. You probably played board games which involved counting, read to your child or listened to his or her stories. You may have checked homework or assisted your child with cooking. Many of these tasks were enjoyable for both of you and often inspired your child to make progress. It is because of this that Koestler declares that a parent is the very best tutor a child can have.

Prepare a space for tutoring
By creating a set environment which is cool, quiet and comfortable, your children will be able to work without distraction. Try to keep all of your tutoring supplies in one place where your children have easy access. If you will be tutoring more than one child, your goal is to give each child individual attention. Create a space where you can move easily from one child to the next.

Allow your children to guide you
Koestler shares that parents may feel anxious about tutoring because they might not feel knowledgeable in an area of study. However, she explains that the role of tutor is one of facilitator rather than one of teacher. By allowing your child to ask questions, explore answers and search for new information or insights, you will enable them to think, learn, grow, read and explore. All of these skills will offer a great learning opportunity where your children are guided by their own innate curiosity.

Have fun
Maths Insider shares that by having fun with your child, encouraging role playing or offering up exciting rewards, you will make learning an enjoyable process for your child. You can offer up activities such as dividing a cake or finger painting spots on a page (and then adding or multiplying them to find an answer). Older children could act out roles in history books or works of literature in order to explore multiple perspectives. By making learning fun you’ll teach your children that challenges do not have to be approached with fear or anxiety.

Focus on your children’s individual needs

As a tutor, you are able to give your child individual attention. While providing tips for tutoring, The School Run gave an example of a parent who taught a child to trust her own answers and move on. By focusing on decisiveness the child was able to complete her exams on time. Each child will have areas of individual struggle. Some children fear getting an answer wrong, while others rush through the work and make careless mistakes. Listening to your child’s fears or anxieties while patiently guiding new options will assist your child to achieve great results.

Parents are always going to be great tutors to their children. Children trust and look up to their parents and have been learning from them all their lives.

As a parent you’re in a perfect position to guide or tutor your child. Working with patience and empathy will assist your child to develop curiosity, confidence and an enjoyment of learning.

My Mood Stars

I met Wendy a few weeks ago as she was spreading word of her unique product.
As a mum I could see the value of this device in helping children to identify and communicate their feelings.
As a language teacher I can see how the product is useful in talking about feelings, whatever the language.
So over to Wendy to tell her story.

Whilst child minding, I came up with the idea for my mood stars. As a childminder, I had to adhere to The Early Years Foundation Framework. Three of the key areas of learning were,

Personal, Social and Emotional development
Communication
Understanding the World.

With this in mind, I came up with the idea for my mood stars.
As I came to create my Mood Stars, I decided to make them from felt with expressions sewn onto them, (Sad, Silly, Surprised, Shy, Cross, Scared, Sleepy and Happy) They covered these areas of learning as well as providing soft, safe and tactile toys for the children to play with.
I found that the Mood Stars helped children recognise their feelings, as well as those of others, by learning the names of the mood / expression on each Mood Star.
As I observed the children playing with the stars, I soon noticed that they began to develop empathy with Sad and Shy Star consoling them in their imaginary play which in turn helped them to come to terms with how they were feeling.

With the help of the Mood Stars, communication with the children became easier. Children were able to relate to the star that expressed the mood that they were in at any particular time. Sleepy Star was often carried to bed at nap time, Sad Star would be cuddled when Mummies and Daddies left for the day and Happy Star was sometimes handed to me just to say “I’m feeling happy!”
The children’s parents would ask me to make sets of My Mood Stars for them to use at home as a useful learning tool, a way of de-stressing night time routines and for behaviour incentives. The unique quality of the Mood Stars was that they could be cuddled and carried around. They were particularly effective for the non-verbal children in the setting. Because of the wider appeal, I set about getting My Mood Stars manufactured.
As I carried out my market research, it became apparent that a board for children to have in their room or play area or for teachers to use in a classroom would be a useful accessory. I wanted to avoid scratchy Hook and Loop type substance on the soft stars I invented a board made from a gentle form of hook and loop material onto which the stars could pop on and off. The sensory experience of this was an added benefit! What also became clear from my market research, from parents of children on the autistic spectrum, was the fact that these children need more help than others recognising facial expressions and facial clues. And that they also found social situations difficult because of this. I got a lot of feed-back from parents of Autistic children, saying that the simplicity of the stars’ facial expressions allow these children simply to focus on the expression on the face of the stars which would help with their social development.
The whole My Mood Stars project has produced a lovely toy, as well as a highly useful learning tool and with no small parts, safe for children of all ages.
Want to know more?
Please follow me on
Facebook
www.facebook.com/mymoodstars

Instagram
www.instagram/mymoodstars41

Twitter

YouTube

Visit my website www.mymoodstars.co.uk for a free ‘Games to Play’ download and a video of me talking about My Mood Stars.

We can offer a special discount for Lingotastic readers. Simply visit www.mymoodstars.co.uk to take advantage of our 10% pre order discount from £29.99 to £27.00

How can NCS help your teen?

My son Josh really enjoyed taking part in the National Citizen Service course, so when we were approached to help reach other parents about NCS, we were really keen to be involved.

So what is National Citizen Service?

“NCS is a government backed programme established in 2011 to help build a more cohesive, mobile and engaged society. By bringing together young people from different backgrounds for a unique shared experience, NCS helps them to become better individuals, and in turn better citizens.”

NCS is open to 16 and 17 year-olds across England and Northern Ireland. The two to four week programme, which takes place in school holidays, includes outdoor team-building exercises, a residential for participants to learn ‘life skills’, a community-based social action project and an end of programme celebration event.
My eldest son Josh was invited to take part via a presentation at his school, back in 2016. He came home really keen to take part so we signed him up asap. He finished the term early that year, as he had just finished his GCSE exams so it was a good time for him to sign up. NCS is amazing value for money. The whole experience including food, accommodation and travel costs £50 and bursaries are available on a case by case basis. Support is also provided for young people with additional needs.

As a family we often take holidays together and visit family both in the UK and abroad. We wondered how three weeks of NCS would fit into this. Thankfully there was a big choice of dates so we could choose one that worked for us.
Though NCS he would meet, and work with others from different backgrounds and cultures which as a diverse, multilingual family ourselves we hold as very important.

So over to Josh to describe his experience of NCS.
I really enjoyed my experience of NCS. On the first part of NCS which was in the Mendip hills I got to know and bond with my group. We all came from different backgrounds which helped create a unique and fun experience together. On the residential trip in which we stayed in university style accommodation we were set a budget and had to purchase all our ingredients for the whole week which helped teach us important skills such as budgeting, cooking, teamwork as we had to work together to prepare our meals. These skills will help us in the future and help others.
As part of the community project as a group we designed a dragon’s den style pitch to persuade “investors” (People choosing who the best project is and who to give more money for their community project. This helped me build my confidence and public speaking skills as my group leader helped the group design and practice the pitch.


For the community project, we provided an afternoon tea and food in a place which supports people affected by drug and alcohol addiction. We also painted a mural for them so that we could show our support. The afternoon was enjoyed by all people there and our whole group was proud of what we had done together and how we had helped other people.
On the residential trip, in which we stayed in university style accommodation, we were set a budget and had to purchase all our ingredients for the whole week which helped teach us important skills such as budgeting, cooking, teamwork as we had to work together to prepare our meals. These skills will help us in the future and help others.
During the residential time, my team was given a skill to learn with a mentor. My team was given Photography to learn. I really enjoyed learning this as I take photographs as a hobby anyway. Each team was given a different skill to learn which gives a wide range of skills that were being taught. We took photos together across the town and presented them to families who came along on the last day.
There were over 100,000 teenagers on NCS over the whole summer, this means that a lot of new friendships will have been made, new skills developed and the opportunity to develop a community. It was very enjoyable, and I also had an amazing time. I wouldn’t hesitate to sign up again.

Josh came back form each section excited about the new experiences he had had and friendships he had made. (I think the main aim of the outdoor team building for the teens was to find which corner of the site had internet reception!) He came away from the residential section with increased confidence in his meal planning and cooking skills, which I consider really important life skills. In the social action project the teens were engaged in helping those in society they may never have worked with before, In the initial team building phase he was able to take part in some outdoor activities he had not done before, as well as making lots of friends.

11th September 2016
NCS Graduation @ Athena, Leicester, UK
© Tom Horton
www.tom-horton.co.uk

As well as a fun experience NCS was set up with a purpose in mind.
By bringing together young people from different backgrounds for a unique shared experience, NCS helps them to become better individuals, and in turn better citizens
NCS was established to help build a more cohesive, mobile and engaged society
As Josh said, “It was very enjoyable, and I also had an amazing time. I wouldn’t hesitate to sign up again” So what are you waiting for?

There are still places available for Year 11s to take part in this once in a lifetime opportunity this summer.

To sign up now, go to the NCS website. use this link:

http://www.ncsyes.co.uk/?utm_source=blogger&utm_medium=website&utm_campaign=summer18


This is a sponsored post.

These are our own thoughts on the NCS scheme. Some of the facts about NCS are taken directly from their promotional material.
The photographs were provided by the post sponsor.

I’m a little teapot -singing fun

Back in October, we took on the crazy task of translation of 36 English nursery rhymes into singable German versions. As we attempted it, we realised why they had not been translated before. After all the work it took us we’d love the translations to be used.

First up is one I love the actions to. I remember singing it myself as a little girl so here goes… I’m a little teapot.

I’m a little teapot

I’m a little teapot, Short and stout
Here is my handle, Here is my spout

When I get all steamed up, I just shout
Tip me over and pour me out

I’m a very special pot. It’s true
Here’s an example of what I can do

I can turn my handle into a spout
Tip me over and pour me out

I’m a little teapot, Short and stout
Here is my handle, Here is my spout

When I get all steamed up, I just shout
Tip me over and pour me out

Ich bin ‘ne kleine Kanne, klein und rund
Hier ist mein Griff, und hier ist mein Mund

Fang ich an zu dampfen, hör mich schrein
Schütt mich aus, gieß den Tee ein

Ich bin ‘ne kluge Kanne, ja und dann
Werd’ ich dir zeigen was ich kann.

Ich dreh mich im Kreis und das ist fein
Schütt mich aus, gieß den Tee ein

Ich bin ‘ne kleine Kanne, klein und rund
Hier ist mein Griff, und hier ist mein Mund

Fang ich an zu dampfen, hör mich schrein
Schütt mich aus, gieß den Tee ein

After all that talk of tea, I’m putting the kettle on.

So, what do you think? I’d love to see a video of your family or German class singing along to it.

The weird and wonderful English Language Giveaway

Apologies for the radio silence recently. We’ve had a really busy time as a family.

We’ve still been playing languages at home.

This morning I woke my teen asking him what he would like for breakfast in French. He answered “I can hear you but I can’t French right now”

I asked my daughter “Tu veux combien de Croissants?”  She answered “deux”

The current government obsession with spag (Spelling and Grammar) means my girls are coming home with puzzling work sheets (What on earth is a fronted adverbial?) Even us adults puzzle over it. English spelling is odd and the reason is that English is such a mix of other languages. It is crazy that English spelling is taught in schools using phonics. English is the least phonetic language there is. This is mostly because of the invasions and settlers from other countries who introduced words of their language.

 

A few months back a linguist friend mentioned to us about the Stephen Fry and the Fry’s Planet World series. As well as loving languages we also love linguistics finding out how languages evolve and keep on evolving. This

 

We’ve a copy of Fry’s planet world to giveaway so you can enjoy it too. Simply enter via the rafflecopter link.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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