Category Archives: Learning Tips

Speak Polish! How Kids Make Absolutely Awesome Motivation

I’m learning Polish at the moment with uTalk (blog comjng very soon). This week we are lucky to have a guest blog from Nathan at how to speak Polish. I hope it inspires you to learn Polish too.

Nathan from HowToSpeakPolish.com at Wawel Castle in Kraków, Poland“I don’t know where it is!”

Aged 23, that’s exactly what I would have told you if you’d have asked me about Poland. I hadn’t even met a Pole until 2013. Little did I know that I’d end up marrying the first one that I spoke to!

My name is Nathan and given my background, it’s quite surprising that I’m an ambassador of the Polish language. I was born in 1991 and raised in Swindon, England to a family of Jamaican and Barbadian heritage. Although I am from an English-speaking family, I encountered French at a young age. At school I had Spanish classes too, but after years of lessons in both I could never hold a conversation. Despite my lack of proficiency, exposure to foreign languages as a child taught me how much fun they were and I continued to dabble in them in adulthood.

My Polish language learning journey

Nathan from HowToSpeakPolish.com making friends with a Polish accordion playerI started learning Polish in 2013 after being invited to a wedding in Western Poland. I’d heard false rumours that Polish people were racist towards black people, so I decided to learn some phrases beforehand in order to say hello and get myself out of a sticky situation should it arise.

Nothing would stick! After failing to learn anything from my local library’s audio courses, I actually quit learning Polish – twice! For me, it was third time lucky when I started using my current method to learn the meanings of whole sentences. I bought a cheap phrasebook and went from there.

Following the wedding, I continued learning and started speaking to natives on Skype. After 14 months of struggling, I had finally achieved my goal to speak Polish with natives with ease!

Of course, I never would have achieved my goal without guidance. My language learning heroes are Khatzumoto, Luca Lampariello and Olly Richards. I have been influenced by many others, but these three are a cut above the rest. They inspire me not only with their language proficiency, but also with their willingness to help others to follow in their path. On my website, HowToSpeakPolish.com, I help other Polish learners in the same way that these titans have helped me.

Although I can speak Polish, I continue to study so that I can teach my children to speak Polish from birth. I plan to exclusively speak Polish to my kids. If I don’t, I’ll be robbing them of a suitable environment to learn. I want to give them every opportunity to get to know their mother’s family, friends and history.

My top tips

If I could give you one language learning tip knowing what I know now, it’s “Focus on learning the language that you need”. There are so many languages that you’ll never speak them all. There’s so much vocabulary that you’ll never learn it all. Concentrate on acquiring the words specific to you and your interests.

As for pronunciation, here are my top tips:

If you know someone who wants to speak Polish, tell them about HowToSpeakPolish.com. We can conquer Polish together!

Has this inspired you? Let us know in the comments below.

Cooking with Languages- Lisa Sadler

I’d like to introduce my friend Lisa and her brillliant language learning resource, Cooking with Languages. She shares my passion for encouraging family language learning.I’ll let her introduce herself.

My name is Lisa Sadleir. I am the founder of Cooking with Languages and my aim is to do for languages what Jamie Oliver has done for cooking. I’m trilingual myself and passionate about giving children the gift of languages. Conscious that children often see learning as a chore, I’ve decided it was time to make languages fun.

I’m extremely lucky. I have grown up with languages. Speaking languages has enhanced my life and provided me with so many wonderful opportunities. I am British born, educated in France and I’ve been a resident of Spain for almost 25 years. I am a mother to two amazing bilingual children, Joshua and Francesca (the voices of Arthur and Nerea).

I have given my children the gift of languages and we now want to share this gift with as many children as possible.Using food and cooking as tools to learning language makes it more natural. Children are having fun and are not necessarily realising that they are learning!

At Cooking with languages, our mission is to get children motivated about learning languages. We aim to excite and inspire.


5 Reasons Why Our Activity Cookbook Makes Language Learning Fun:
All the content Is In both English and Spanish (facilitates comprehension).
We provide simple and scrummy recipes (simple steps to follow). Ii
Children love Arthur Apple and Nerea Naranja, our fun, language assistants.
There are plenty of games and activities to practise new language and words.
We are making audio available so you can listen and repeat.

Have you ever thought about using food and cooking to enhance your child’s language learning experience? We have and this is why our family project is now Crowdfunding ….Our materials are designed to motivate and excite children to learn new words and phrases in different languages, with the added bonus of making simple and scrummy recipes at the same time.

Get your discounted materials: http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/cooking-with-languages

In addition to using food and cooking for learning languages, you can use them to help with:

– Improving motor skills in younger children: start with soft foods that they can add/mix/grate/cut with plastic scissors or child-friendly knives …
– Mathematical skills: from number recognition, basic sums, to learning weights and measures,
– Reading and comprehension: encourage your child to read the recipe to you, ask them questions that spark their imagination eg. How do they think the food will look? Taste? smell?
– Telling the time and measuring time
– Boosting vocabulary: ingredients, using descriptive words to describe how food looks, smells and sounds while it’s cooking,

This is a brilliant idea to bring language learning into everyday life. Go help the crowdfunder here and bag yourself a brilliant resource in the process.

Here is the link to view our LIVE CROWDFUNDER Campaign:

http://bit.ly/makingsuperheroes

Flash Academy – Have you joined?

If you follow me on Twitter you will know I’ve been asked to beta test the new sparkly Flash sticks app Flash Academy.

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If you’ll already know I’m a read my blogs or follow us on pinterest or Instagram you will know I am a big fan of FlashSticks sticky post it notes. They are colour coded to help you remember the gender of words. Blue for masculine, pink for feminine and yellow for verbs and adjectives. For a visual learner like me they are a godsend. Simply stick them around your home or take photos when you are out and about like me! You can use the new Flash Academy app to scan any note for an instant pronunciation video from a native speakers. This is an unlimited free feature for all users. We interviewed Veejay about how the idea for Flash Sticks came about last year, read about it here.

Our Lingotastic classes are in basic French, German and Spanish and occasionally Mandarin. It is a ongoing task to keep my skills going in all these languages. As a busy mum,  as well as a teacher my time is limited so I need to be able to learn in pockets of time and apps like this fit the bill for me.

 

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The app includes hundreds of short 5-minute interactive language lessons and a series of fast-paced (for me nail biting) word games to consolidate learning. Learners continually ‘graduate’ to new levels as their fluency in the language develops.

 

I like that the first words learned are food (breakfast) so useful words to learn. There are almost three hundred language lessons available for each language, with six lessons initially provided free of charge (five in basics, one in Food & Drink)

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The graphics are brightly coloured with appealing pictures. They remind me a lot of WII games! The words are spoken as they are seen by a native speaker, which is a big plus to me! I recently realised that, in my GCSE courses I learned ,to read and write much better than pronounce. This really helps to rectify this, as I can see it written, and hear it at the same time. The app also has occasional grammar and culture tips which are really useful to learn alongside the language.

I was interested how it worked for children, so I got my eight year old, who has only just started French to test it as well. She liked it and managed to understand the more complicated parts at the end.

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The only downside I found was, as an intermediate language learner I would like to assess where I am at and start from there. Flash Academy does not have that functionality.

 

The cherry on top of the app is the amazing sci fi object scanner. Simply switch on the object scanner and take a picture of the object and by some kind of magic the app tells you what it is in English and your chosen language of over 40 languages !

Anyway, what are you waiting for? Boost your family language skills AND have fun along the way!

 

The app is free to download on

App and Google Play stores, with subscription plans starting at £2.99 per month.

FlashAcademy is perfect for all ages and all language levels.

For more information visit www.flashacademyapp.com

Flash Sticks sticky notes are a really simple tool to increase your vocabulary in French, German, Spanish, Italian, BSL and English. (with more to come)
The guys at FlashSticks have offered Lingotastic customers a special discount.
10% off at Flash Sticks use the coupon code lingotastic10 (in lower case).

Disclaimer: These are my own thoughts and opinions. FlashSticks gave me a three month subscription in order to review this app which is just as well since I’ve found it to be addictive… What can I scan next?

 

 

Bird food as a language learning supertool

We started a homeschooling adventure at the end of May. It was a bit unexpected but it is a lot of fun.

We’ve done a lot of project based work, so when I heard Ivel Valley were looking for bloggers to review their bird feed, we jumped at the chance. It begs the question: Can you learn with bird food?

Here is our very silly Unboxing Film. (They do say not to work with children or animals)

There are so many learning experiences in everyday life, for languages, science, maths, literacy and lots more.
We’ve been feeding the birds for a while, but just cheap bird seeds. As you can see in the video, this is so much better than what we usually feed them. I’m sure the birds will love us now!

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There are so many learning experiences in everyday life, for languages, science, maths, literacy and lots more.
Feeding birds fits into science work on food chains. It fosters a nurturing attitude to caring for nature. We can use maths whilst measuring out what we need. We can spot birds coming and chart it. (Maths too) We can chat about the birds in another language, German is our second language at home, I’ll be learning too as I don’t yet know many bird’s names in German!

So whilst following the nature topic this week we came across some brillant things. So, why is bird food a language learning supertool?

We came across a traditional German Children’s song. Alle Vögel sind schon da. I hope you enjoy this lively version.

In our garden, this week we’ve seen pigeons, robins, sparrows, bluetits, thrushes, blackbirds and red kites.

So the German names for these are

We found some poetry on birds to use literacy skills. We’ve been looking at symmetry in nature. We read about food chains and my daughter wrote some food chains including birds both as predator and prey. As the work we did was rooted in the project for the week there is a direct link which helps to keep an interest in the work we are doing.

Would you like to buy some of this brilliant bird food for yourself. Pop over to the website Ivel Valley

Are there any more names for birds you think we’ve missed? Add you comments below.

Are you home schooling? How do you work with your little ones? Let us know in the comments below.

Cooking, Carafes and learning Italian

We’ve a brillant guest blog from Kate at Cooking and Carafes She talks about her experience of learning Italian both at home, and in the country.
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I’ve always liked languages, when I was little we used to holiday to Spain and I always had my hands on the phrase book. I would be learning the basics myself and then would endlessly recite numbers, days of the week and other basic phrases to my parents. I enjoyed learning languages at secondary school but French and German didn’t have the same affinity with me as Italian (which wasn’t an option to study). Although I studied Latin which I’m certain built the perfect foundations for when I later went on to learn Italian.

From the age of 10 we started to go on family holidays to Italy and that’s where my love affair with this beautifully romantic language began. Not only did I fall in love with the country; the scenery, the people, the food, the hand gestures, and the list goes on… but the language too.

Italians are so passionate, I used to watch them speaking to one another, gesturing, emphasising some phrases over others and thinking ‘I wish I knew what they were saying’. So once again I began with the phrase book and as holidays became more frequent both my mum and my sister took up Italian evening classes so I would use their books to teach myself.

I taught myself a fair amount and would use the books and the tapes/CDs to help me. When I went to university I got the chance to study Italian as one of my modules on my course. It was by far my favourite subject, so much so I got a First in this particular module. We had a great teacher, Claudio – he made learning enjoyable and fun and would take his time when you needed help.

After uni, I couldn’t contain my desire to travel and learn a language any longer, so in the midst of not knowing what I was going to do once I completed my degree I applied for jobs as a holiday rep in Italy. I was lucky enough to land myself a job with Citalia based on the beautiful island of Sardinia. I thought I’d hit the jackpot… and I had!

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That summer I flew out to Italy and completed my training in the town where my love for the country first began, Sorrento (near Naples). After a few weeks there I flew to Cagliari (an airport that would soon become my weekly hangout with new arrivals and departures!) and was based in the south of Sardinia in a little town called Pula on the coast of Santa Margherita di Pula about 45 minutes from the island’s capital.
Here is where my real language learning journey began…

I moved into my own apartment, right in the heart of Pula, Piazza del Popolo and lived next to a delightful older couple Angioletta and her husband. They ran a small souvenirs shop next door, she would greet me every morning and evening…Piccolina! And would continue to talk to me at a rate of knots in Italian, I didn’t understand a word! In the first few days of being on my own this is when I realised to enjoy this I had to embrace the language. So I began slowly; può parlare più lentamente per favore became my favourite phrase, and the more I tried, the more I learnt.

Sardinia is more popular with German and Italian tourists so although a lot of my friends spoke English it wasn’t as good as some of their other languages. I immersed myself in their culture, I would spend evenings with friends and I would be the only English person so naturally they mainly spoke Italian and the more words I heard and the more I asked what they meant, they slowly began to stick. You learn familiar conversations and can start responding more easily, learning key phrases and words and more importantly how to piece them together – this was a turning point to being able to engage in conversation.

My real time to practice was on my coach journeys to and from the airport, as a lot of my friends worked in hotels or bars so knew English, just some weren’t as confident or as fluent as they were in other languages. However, my coach drivers were all Sardinian so if anything they just spoke more Sard (the island’s dialect), so each week I would have two return transfers with different drivers so I would practice my Italian with them and then when a flight was delayed we’d teach each other over un cafe in the airport’s bar. They would try to get me to learn their dialect and to this day I think I still only know a few phrases one of which was Comme menti staisi? How are you? Which in Italian is Come stai?

I could sit here and regale many moments of learning Italian in Sardinia… like when the concierge from one of my hotels helped me on my first day and I thought he didn’t speak any English so the entire time he let me muddle my way through broken Italian… later on I found out he was fluent, he also turned out to be one of my best friends!
Once I returned home at the end of my season my heart was heavy with love for ‘my’ beautiful island, its people, its culture and my desire to keep speaking Italian.

I continued with a few local lessons and then one to one lessons with local Italian Romilda who was wonderful – her enthusiasm and confidence in me knew no bounds. Unfortunately work and day to day life got in the way and my Italian dwindled.

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A few trips to Italy though and it’s amazing what comes back to you in a short space of time, you only have to hear a word once and it comes back so easily. Now with another holiday on the horizon (to ‘my island’) it’s motivated me to refresh my language skills so I’m using the app Babbel at the moment which is brilliant as it works on repetition and across writing, speaking and listening, along with grammar modules and all at various levels.

Obviously language learning has moved on in the last 20 years since I was at Secondary school, you can now access more tools to help you learn. The internet and smartphones have transformed learning a language, and at the touch of a button you can look up words on a smart phone with Google translate, use an app to help you learn, read articles in different languages, speak to friends in other countries more easily using skype/facetime and messaging services like whatsapp and so on.

However you decide to learn whether it’s at a local college’s evening class or within an online community or in the country itself, it will help build confidence when conversing in other languages, whether it’s on holiday or for business. Learning a new language is hugely rewarding and will also help stimulate your mind so why not start learning a new language today!

My love for Italy has continued, mainly with my love of their food and wine so check out my Italian recipes ideas and wine reviews at www.cookingandcarafes.co.uk

Language learning à Paris

Language learning à Paris

If you follow us on twitter and Facebook you will know Pascal our French puppet has been out and about in Paris during May half term. Can you guess what he saw?

Our nine year old had been asking to go to Paris for a while. We found a good deal on the Eurostar and the most amazing apartment, Le Loft at Chez Bertrand.We’ll be posting a blog soon about our tips for visiting Paris with children.

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As you can see we had a lot of fun seeing the sights. As a family of language learners, of course we had to learn or improve our French as well. Hearing and reading so much French meant us grown ups were using it much more than usual. I realised when crossing the road I automaticly gave instructions in French “Vite!” “Allons-y!” “On y va” The children responded as if they understood. The girls were reading on the Metro “Sortie” Whilst looking around Notre Dame my youngest daughter said “that sortie is closed”.
After a busy day my daughter came home and flopped on the bed. Daddy asked “Est-ce que tu est fatiguée?” My daughter thought this was a very silly word so often said “I’m fatiguée” and “Je suis fatiguée”. Our son has studied French to year 9 and I was surprised how much he used on holiday, as his last school French lesson was two years ago.

Each morning We went to la boulangerie to buy le pain. The children helped write the shopping list. Les bonbons was their favorite thing to write. It was not all unhealthy though. My daughters found some apples with stickers to decorate them “tête du Pomme” I’ve not seen them enjoying apples so much before. In the supermarket the girls were really excited to find l’escargot. Strangely enough, they did not fancy eating them.

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We toured the notable landmarks in Paris and heard others speaking French. The children were really excited to see the famous landmarks in real life. Our Jasmin was so excited about the Eiffel tower I thought she may pop! As you may see from the pictures it was a very wet few days, one day it was so damp we could not see the top of the Eiffel tower and the Seine was close to bursting it’s banks. A few days later The Louvre was closed to move priceless paintings up a floor to safely and the Notre Dame was also at risk of flooding.

We visited Parc Asterix which Maik had wanted to visit for 25 years. We had a lot of fun and read and heard a lot of French there. The rides were really good for all our ages. We’ll tell you a lot more in a blog so stay tuned.

When in Paris we stumbled upon an amazing museum of Language and linguistics called Mundolingua. It was just up our street and really interactive so the kids enjoyed it as well. We could have spent much longer there than we did. It was huge fun and we’ll have a blog all about it on the way.

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Our time in Paris was a great boost to all our families French learning and gave them us real life examples to hang our language learning on.

What langauges are you learning as a family? Have you visited the country to help achieve this? We’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

Do picture books help children learn another language?

This week we are really blessed to guest blog from the lovely Nathalie. We met on twitter and have a shared love for picture books and puppets. So over to Nathalie.Natalie 4

For as far back as I can remember, I have always loved books and been surrounded by them. When my children (now 12 and 15) were born and I decided to bring them up bilingual (English and French) I am convinced books played a major part in their success… thanks to my parents who always bought so many stories for them! I read to Leah and Max in French every day and they learnt naturally, without any lessons, to read French; Max read so much by himself he taught himself to write in French too. However I never actually thought of making it part of my business until I had so many children’s books that I started to wonder what I was going to do with them! Books in English and books for adults I never kept you see; I believe books are only alive if they are being read and shared and it was easy to give them away, but books in French… Well they were too heavy to take back to France and I didn’t know anyone in the UK who would appreciate them! My dream was to open a French library; then my best friend came up with the amazing idea of a mobile library!
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You can check out photos of the bus on my website: http://natta-lingo.gihem.info/
The books I travel around with on my Bibliobook are mostly picture books. Why, might you ask, should anyone want to pay me to go and tell a story to their children in French? If you attend any of Sarah’s classes I am sure you are not asking yourself this question as she is a fan of books (and puppets!) herself. We all accept that stories in their native language are good for our children and they are encouraged to be read to and to read from a very young age. Moreover research shows that sharing stories in a second language (even without being bilingual) helps to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills! (more about various research projects here http://natta-lingo.gihem.info/spip.php?article114) More than 2000 booksChildren still love books as real objects; they enjoy sitting on the carpet and listening to a story, even more so if they can act it out with props! This we do on le Bibliobook whilst surrounded by nearly 2000 French books!! It is great fun and we know our children will learn better and be more motivated when they have fun… Not just little ones either!

If you do not have access to authentic books in another language, please check out One Third Stories for virtual stories which start in English and end in another language. That’s another great fun way of learning with stories!
So if you get the chance to, please take your children to storytelling sessions (in any language!) and keep reading to them or with them (in any language you can too!). You and they will never wish you hadn’t done it!
Natalie writes weekly blogs about picture books that are great for language learning.

Why learn languages?

This week my friend Teddy Nee from Nee’s language blog talks about the value of learning languages

“Why should you bother learning another language when you already know English?”
Someone might have ever asked this question to you before, and how did you react to it? Or let’s assume nobody had asked this question to you, how would you answer it when you are asked?

I was frequently asked by either my friends or acquaintances why do you learn languages. They know and we all know that I know English because if you can understand this text, it means that I know English. Having been asked that question, I have only one answer, “Not everyone is eager to speak English or can express themselves well in English.”

We should accept the fact that nowadays we can get information from other countries in other languages much easier than, let’s say, 20 years ago. It mainly because of the internet. The internet has really changed our way of life, and it even has created so many jobs that weren’t existed before. I work as an IT engineer, and it is not easy to explain about what I really do to my parents, or even to my grandparents because what I am doing did not exist in their time when they were at my age.

So, this easy access to information has caused globalization to happen where companies can establish partnership with overseas companies, and have the ability to expand their market even to much larger scope, not to mention inter countries, but inter continents.

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English as a universal language
English language which originated from England has apparently became a universal language that two persons from different countries would use to communicate unconsciously because they thought English is supposed to be the language that everyone understands for international communication.

If you often gather information from the internet, you must have realized that most contents are available in English. Therefore, if you know English, you can get much more information that those who don’t know English. That’s the fact! However, I need to remind you that there is still limitation for using English to search for information, especially if the information is more personal that only speakers of the original language could have the privilege for the access.

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Taking part in an international community
When we discuss about a universal language, a question might occur in mind, that is “What is a truly universal language?” and “How do we define a universal language?”. The United Nations even has 6 official languages — English, Mandarin, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Russian. We might also be intrigued to talk about a constructed language for international communication, Esperanto.

Esperanto speakers around the world have been vigorously promoting Esperanto as the language for international communication. Nowadays, we can see many activities done in Esperanto, such as activities related to education, charity, science research, journalism, commerce, and so on. Although there are quite a lot of people who are still pessimistic and skeptical about Esperanto language being a human communication tool.

We need to have more knowledge about other language in order to get access to much more information, and to be able to get to know more people from other countries, especially those who don’t speak English or our languages. On top of that, language learning is like an investment. Spending a little time and effort to learn a language that you could use for your whole life doesn’t seem to be a big deal.

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Choosing a language to learn
When you search for, let’s say, top 10 most favorited languages in the world, top 10 languages with the most speakers, top 10 languages for job seekers, etc. you can get abundant of results. The most important is to know your goal, whether you want to learn the language because there is more job opportunities in your area or you want to learn the language that is completely different from that you have known or you want to learn a language that is similar with that you have known. Deciding the goal is the very first thing you need to do.

If you like challenge, you should choose to learn language from other language family. For example, if you know English, you can pick Hindi, Mandarin or Russian as your target language. If you want to quickly reach higher level of understanding in other language, you should choose to learn language from the same language family. For example, if you know Spanish, you can choose to learn Italian, Portuguese or French.

There is actually a rule of thumb that many language courses don’t teach you. If you want to impress your friends with the amount of languages that you know, learn languages from the same family group because they share so many similarities that you even already can understand a big portion of it without learning. Thus, it is not surprising to know a someone who knows 5-6 languages but those languages are from the same language family.

Depending on your geographical location, some languages might not be useful. Let’s say you will spend some months in Latin America. Your focus should be Spanish rather than Japanese, and perhaps, the second language could be Portuguese. However, any languages will likely be useful if your activities are internet-based since the majority of people around the world have had access to internet nowadays.

So I ask again. Why learn languages? Knowing more languages is always beneficial. Apart from giving you more opportunities to enjoy what speakers of those languages can enjoy, you can also enrich yourself by broaden your viewpoint and increasing your skills. Learning language also trains your brain and it certainly increase your intelligence. No wonder, many articles state the benefits of knowing more languages as if there is no downside of it.

Teddy loves to learn languages.

Teddy loves to learn languages.

Teddy Nee is a passionate language learner and blogger. An IT Engineer by day and a language learner by night. His mission is to raise awareness of the importance of knowing more languages and to educate more people to be global citizens. He believes that learning the language of the others is a milestone to reach world peace. You can correspond with him in Medan Hokkien, Indonesian, English, Chinese Mandarin, Spanish, and Esperanto. Visit his blog at Nee’s language blog.

Can you pass on a language without being a native speaker?

Today we have an interview with Rachel, who is teaching her daughter french, but she’s not a native speaker of french.
I’d been chatting to Rachel before. We met via the Speak to the Future LinkedIn group. I was really excited when I found out she’s teaching her own child French at home, although her mother tongue is English, like we’re doing at home.

Learning about le poisson d'Avril

Learning about le poisson d’Avril

We met Rachel in her hometown of Carlisle in the Easter holidays.

– The first question was from Emily: Why do you live in the north?

I’m from this area and my parents live here. There’s lots to do with little ones in Carlisle.

– What do you do for work?

I’m a freelance translator of French and German and private tutor of French. I also occasionally do some voluntary work in French classes in a local infant school.

– What made you want to introduce a foreign language to M?

I can see that it’s a massive advantage for her to be introduced to languages at a young age. Little ones are like sponges – they learn so quickly. She’s at an age where she’s not shy about using another language. I have the language skills so can pass them on to her. I know she won’t become bilingual through me – I’m not a native speaker and we don’t live in France – but I want her to have a good grounding in another language, to enjoy it and be confident in it. I was surprised from how early on she could distinguish between French and English and how much she has picked up.

– Do you do lessons with your little one?

No, we simply do it as part of our everyday life. She likes to watch “Pierre le lapin” (Peter Rabbit) and other English-language cartoons she knows on the tablet in French, as well as original French-language cartoons. We’ve also got some CDs of French songs – she in particular likes trying to sing along to songs on one called “Maxi Enfance”. We enjoy sharing French books and puzzles. I’ve got a French mummy friend we exchange books with, which is a great advantage.
I joke with friends that I teach her “French by torture” – we play a tickling game where I’ll stop tickling only when she says “arrête”. She often shouts “encore”!
We visit France together. Last time we were there, M bought herself a book. I explained the procedure/what to say, all in French, and she quite happily went to the counter and said all the right things at the right time, and was delighted to have “tricked” the lady into thinking she was French!
She’s just started French lessons at her preschool, so we’ll see if she lets on that she knows lots or is quiet and acts like she doesn’t know any!

"We love to share these magazines together"

“We love to share these magazines together”

Alongside learning the actual language, I also think it’s important to teach M about some of the traditions and culture of France. For example, we recently read an article together on Easter in France, from which M not only learned a couple of new Easter-related words but was also interested to find out about the “cloches volantes” that bring sweets to children in France. We also had fun making “poissons d’avril” as I taught her about this French 1st of April tradition. I was also able to use this activity to reinforce colour words with her.

– Finally, what would you say to other parents wishing to pass on their language skills to their little one?

Go for it! There’s no better time to learn than when they’re young – the younger the better! Especially if you’re a native speaker, but even if you aren’t but have the right background and skills in the foreign language. It’s fun for both of you and wonderful to see their progress.

Is this THE best method for learning a language?

Languages, lessons and learning

This week we have a blog from Alex who is just as evangelistic about early language learning as us here at Lingotastic. Over to Alex…

Hi, I’m Alex the worst tanned Paraguayan EVER. This is a sort of summary of my language learning journey and the entrepreneurial adventure I’ve embarked on since graduating from university in languages last year. I’ve co-founded One Third Stories, where we create bedtime stories that start in English and end in a different lingua.

I would describe my upbringing as alternativo, as there aren’t many people who are born in Paraguay, America del Sud and look this white. I’m told I sound typically British when I speak in inglese, but then when I switch to spagnolo, people will recognise a strong accent from America del Sud that feels out of place, given my pasty complexion. But that’s just me (and my unfortunately pasty siblings).

A none Paraguayan looking family

A none Paraguayan looking family

There are so many benefits to learning another language, but when I was growing up I never realised how lucky I truly was. My parents were missionaries (another reason for my use of the word alternativo), and they made the conscious decision to bring me, my brother and my sister up bilingual. My dad was the linguist (he just loves words) and would speak to us three in spagnolo, and my madre would speak to us in inglese. We attended an international scuola there studying everything in both lingue.

Moving to the UK helped me realise how lucky I was to speak other lingue. From a professional perspective they helped me get my first ‘real job’, as a Spanish Assistant at the scuola I attended as a student (Biddenham Upper School). Academically, I realised that it was something I wanted to pursue further so I decided study Politics with italiano e portoghese at università. My Year Abroad was the best year of my life, and the one where I probably changed the most. I was an intern at Armani, studied in Venice and volunteered in Brazil during the World Cup. I truly believe every person should live abroad for a little while, but unfortunately it’s something that doesn’t happen often enough.

Brazil, France and England/Paraguay during the 2014 World Cup

Brazil, France and England/Paraguay during the 2014 World Cup

Besides offering me experiences to meet amazing people, opportunità to travel and grow as a person, lingue have played opened up so many doors. I graduated last year and with one Third Stories found a way to pursue this passion I share with Sarah, and inspire the linguists of tomorrow. I’m lucky enough to be working with one of my best friends Jonny Pryn, one of the first people I met in the UK, who has a lifetime worth of negative experiences in languages and is absolutely convinced we can provide a single positive one for future generations. If you want to check out our work we have a free audiobook of ‘The Three Little Pigs’ to learn español or française.

'The Three Little Pigs'

‘The Three Little Pigs’

‘The Three Little Pigs’

Is this THE best method for learning a language? If you feel like you’ve understood the lingua (italiano) I’ve embedded in my story, then our ‘Clockwork Methodology’ works. If you want to find out a little più about it go to One Third Stories, visit our website or email me at alex@onethirdstories.com

Let us know what you think in the comments below.

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