Tag Archives: A Level

Charlie’s language learning journey and Bili

This week we have an interview with an inspirational language learner Charlie and hear his project Bili.

Could you tell us about your own language learning journey, at home and school as a child.

I started learning French at primary school, and soon after began to learn Latin. I think this helped me get my head around new languages relatively quickly, and made me a bit of a life-long grammar geek.

When we had options to choose an extra language I chose German, probably mostly because of a conversation I had with my teacher who recommended German because it was ‘harder’ and I could pick up Spanish anytime… (Still working on that one)! The nature of learning a language ‘little and often’ fitted much better with my approach than more content-filled subjects, where last-minute cramming never really paid off for me!

This conversation really stuck with me, and I began to think of myself as someone who was quite good at languages. I remember this as a pivotal moment that set me on a path through GCSEs, A-levels, a degree, year abroad and into teaching and setting up Bili. As a teacher, I’d try to remind myself how much impact those little chats or passing comments can have on our students.

 

What inspired you to love languages?

Having a positive attitude set me on a good course in languages but didn’t yet make me love them. My real love for languages was really sparked by the doors it opened for me, through a combination of travelling, living abroad, and getting to know a culture and people different from my own.

For me, a love of languages comes from a love of communication, which fulfils one of the most natural and human urges to connect with other people. The more languages you learn, and the better you learn them, the more interesting and different people you can connect with on a deeper level.

 

What led you to pass on your love of languages to others through teaching?

Even as a student I understood that not everyone felt the same way about learning languages I did. For years MFL teachers have struggled against a decline in uptake of languages at a higher level, often low motivation in class and some quite strong societal pressures that English is enough. Contrasted with the economic need for languages (it’s estimated that we lose £50 billion every year through lack of language skills), and the more simple desire to learn languages (Ask any adult a skill they regret not learning- chances are they will say a musical instrument and a language!); it’s clear we have a problem.

I wanted to play a part in making sure that children were given the same chance I was, to learn and love languages.

 

Could you tell us about Bili. (What is it and why will it help our readers?)

Bili was an idea that only came about through my direct experience working as a teacher. I was becoming frustrated by the contrived nature of the dreaded controlled assessment, jumping through hoops for exams, and parroting back ‘A* phrases’ about holidays or free time activities.

I wanted to find a context where students could share with someone who was genuinely interested, and vice versa. I wanted a way to connect my students to young people abroad to regularly and purposefully communicate with one another. Since I couldn’t find one… I ended up setting it up for myself 😊

Bili enables teachers from different countries to connect their students in a structured and secure environment to complement their learning in the classroom, applying what they have learnt in a real context. Learners can share real information about their lives with Bili-pals the same age, whilst discovering another culture & language, and supporting one another on their language learning journey. Students actively want to communicate and a real-person at the other end provides a strong motivation.  Regular tasks, higher motivation and valued performance feedback coming from peers all save the teacher time and increase impact.

We’re always keen to welcome new schools to Bili, whether you simply want to trial with a class, sign up to build on an existing relationship with a partner school abroad, or find a new school to connect with through Bili!

 

https://www.bili.uk.com/

Victoria’s language learning, and teaching story.

Could you tell us about your own language learning journey, at home and school as a child.

 

I remember being interested in languages from an early age.  I was lucky enough as a child to go on family to holidays to France quite a lot (living in Kent made it fairly easy to pop over on the ferry) and I loved trying out phrases my parents taught me.  Normally, buying sweets or asking for ‘frites’ on the campsite.  I was also fascinated with the Netherlands as we have family friends there and I remember dressing up as a Dutch girl for a school summer fayre with the theme of European countries.  When I was in the last year of primary school, a

German lunchtime club was offered which I loved going to.  Moving on to secondary school, I enjoyed both French and German lessons, taking both for GCSE and French for A level.  Following this, I decided to study French at university and start Italian alongside. (I think the incentive of a year abroad was one of the deciding factors for this!)

 

 

What inspired you to love languages?

My teachers at secondary school were very inspiring and I enjoyed all their lessons.  We went on two trips to France with school which were great fun.  I also just enjoyed finding out and learning new vocabulary and for some reason I loved learning French grammar!

 

 

What led you to pass on your love of languages to others through teaching?

 

I have mainly taught in schools located in areas of high deprivation where children don’t often get the opportunities that others would. I think it is really important to widen their horizons and show them there is a world out there with which they can communicate.  I love it when they find out something new about a country or learn a phrase to use.  The children are on a level playing field when learning a language so it gives everyone a chance to shine which is really important, especially for those who may struggle in other areas of the curriculum.  I ran two trips to France at my previous school and the majority of children had never been out of the East Midlands.  It was wonderful to see their fascination when arriving in a different country.

 

Could you tell us about ALL  

 

The Association for Language Learning or ALL is a small charity which promotes language learning and supports teachers in the teaching of languages.  We work closely with a team of volunteers and cultural institutes to provide support and help to anyone teaching a language.  For example, through CPD events, resources, our magazine and research articles.  I think it is important, with the workload of teachers being so high at the moment, that there is good quality support and materials out there to make everyone’s life easier!  I still teach, alongside my role in the office, and the resources and ideas I use from ALL are brilliant. I would urge anyone involved in the teaching of languages to get on board.  We would love to have you as part of our association!

 

Language tuition from Lingotastic

Preparing you for language learning success!

Preparing you for language learning success!

At Lingotastic we believe that language learning can and should be child’s play. You’ll probably know that traditional classroom learning does not work for many learners in the real world, and as research shows, the best way to learn any language, is the same way you learnt your first language: as a natural, fun part of everyday life.

For this reason, we are very excited to offer language tuition, making our unique approach available to a wider age range, and combining it with the best elements of traditional language teaching.

It’s all about helping you become the best learner you can possibly be. Based on our own language learning experience, having learned around a dozen languages to various levels of fluency, we can help you discover how you learn best. Our tuition is delivered by an experienced tutor with secondary MFL teaching experience.

We will get you ready for that exam or holiday!

 

Get in contact today to discuss options.

 

language-books-229x300Languages offered:

  • French
  • German

More to come, please inquire.

 

Pricing:

The price for a 60 minute 1:1 tutoring sessions, within a 10 mile radius of Chesham (Bucks.) is £30.

We may charge extra to travel further.

Tuition is available for all the following:

  • Primary (KS1 & KS2)
  • Secondary (Key Stage 3)
  • GCSE (KS4)
  • A-Level (KS5)
  • Adult Learner

Group tuition is also available to help you spread the cost:

  • Small Group (2-5 students): £40
  • Large Group (6-10 students): £50

Online tuition is available at a reduced rate of only £20 per 60 minute session

Contact Mike@Lingotastic.co.uk to find out how we can help you achieve your language learning goals.

 

What’s the use of French?

We have a brilliant guest post from Jess, on her final week of Erasmus Programme in Nantes, France. Team Lingotastic only exists because of the Erasmus programme, we met in the UK as native German Maik came over with the Erasmus programme. But, enough of our story, over to Jess…

“What is the point of learning French ? Surely they can all speak English over there?”

I am faced with this question almost daily. Friends, family, acquaintances, the internet, even celebrities seem to find learning a second language pointless and a waste of time. (In the words of Jeremy Paxman earlier this month, English is the “only language that you must have”, and learning French is “positively bad for you”)

So, what is the use of French? I often struggle to find the words to answer this question quickly, but in brief: language really is so important in our lives. From the beauty of communication, to the gateway to getting about, language really is essential. We go about our daily business using it, and without language, the world would be completely silent. Learning a second language on top of your mother tongue really is a journey, and you can learn so much more about the world and yourself by doing so. Not everybody on this earth speaks English, and learning French has opened up my mind and given me so many new skills that I would never have gained before.

Hello- multilingual pic

I started my language journey at age 12 in secondary school. Like most of the kids in the class, I never really saw how French could be “useful”, and had a similar mindset to people such as Paxman, thinking that if I spoke English really loudly when abroad everyone would have to understand me (just a hint, this doesn’t work) . It was only at 16 that everything clicked into place, and by watching French films, reading French editions of Cosmopolitan Magazine and listening to French music, I started to see how the language fitted into another culture. I was lucky enough to have a French teacher at A Level who really gave me a love for the language, enough so that I chose to pursue it at a degree level.

Nantes

It is true when they say that you only really learn a language when you become immersed in it. Thanks to the Erasmus Programme, I have been able to study in Nantes, France for the past academic year, and meet the most wonderful people from all around the world. Erasmus is a wonderful scheme and an excellent opportunity for all language learners, as it lets you study or work in the country where your chosen language is spoken, and offers a lot of financial support. I would recommend this programme for anyone looking to improve their language skills, or even start from scratch, as immersion is a great way of getting into a new language and culture.

Learning French in France has helped me improve considerably. You really cannot comprehend how important having a second language is until you live daily life outside of an English speaking country. From organising accommodation, paying rent, getting the bus to going food shopping…all of this requires you to communicate and understand what is being said. You will pick up so quickly, and after a few weeks, it became a second nature. I’ve managed to learn so many quirky expressions, learn so many amazing stories and pick up things that make perfect sense in French but do not even have a meaning in English. I think this is so valuable and special, and helps me love France and French even more.

The skills I have learnt living in France have also been so valuable. Languages teach you so much. You have to think on your feet always, and you have to be confident enough to laugh off the mistakes you make whilst also learning from them. I do not regret moving over to France one bit, and would do this year all over again if I had the time and money. It has been amazing to get this opportunity to go out there and be a part of French society, and speaking the language really makes you feel a part of France.

So the point really of learning a language is that you open your mind. It can take days, weeks, or even years to feel like you have mastered a language, but the skills you gain along with is will aid you for life. I am grateful that my languages journey has been so positive, and I hope that when I qualify as a teacher, my journey can help others to start their own.

If you want to read more of Jess’s time in France check out her blog

JessJess

Live Learn Love Languages with Michaela Haynes

This week we are really lucky to have and interview with Michaela Haynes from Laugh, Learn, Love Languages. I met her a while ago on twitter (@LLLLanguages) As a fellow mumtrepeneur with the same vision we’ve chatted lots (and she’s from Yorkshire like me!) This week is really special for her but I’ll let her tell you about that. Over to you…
Michaela Haynes
Hi, my name is Michaela. I’m a fully qualified teacher who has been working in an outstanding Harrogate school, for 5 years, teaching Spanish and French.
I haven’t always had a love for languages, in fact, it wasn’t until I chose to take an hour of Spanish each week, as part of my Travel and Tourism qualification, that I discovered a wonderful teacher who taught lessons that captured my interest and from then on I had a new passion.
This encouraged me to become a teacher on a mission… to make language learning fun, and therefore motivating and enjoyable.
As many people will know, working in a school involves much more than being in the classroom and teaching the pupils. However, it is the teaching that I love, not the endless paperwork and meetings. After having nearly a year off on maternity leave, the thought of going back to the never-ending marking that kept me at my dining room table until 10pm most evenings and on a Sunday, whilst also juggling a family, seemed impossible. So, I decided that it was time to realise my dream… to teach people my way, the fun way, and to make languages accessible and enjoyable for everyone, all on my terms (well, along with the students’ of course)!
That’s when Laugh, Learn, Love Languages was born.
I had to make a decision. Not return to school at all and risk having no job if things didn’t go well (plus having to pay back my maternity pay) or go back to school three days a week and try to juggle the business and a family all at the same time. I chose the latter. It’s been a very busy and tiring year but I’m so pleased to say that things have gone really well. In fact, I handed in my notice at Easter and today is literally my last day at school!
I’m so looking forward to gaining the work life balance that I wanted, as of course this year has been just as busy as previous years, but I’ve enjoyed the teaching so much more. I love being my own boss and having people trust me to do my job without the pressure of the dreaded OFSTED criteria. I also really like the variety. One minute I’m singing in Spanish with toddlers, the next I’m teaching French to a feisty and competitive couple with lots of banter between them and then the next I’m teaching Spanish A Level to a lovely, hardworking student. What more could I ask for in terms of diversity? No day is ever the same!
I have big plans for the future but of course I will take it one step at a time. With some more hard work and a little bit of luck, perhaps this time next year there will be a team of us at Laugh Learn Love Languages. For now though, I’m just happy to be able to say, “Hi, I’m Michaela, the founder of Laugh Learn Love Languages and things are going really well”.
To everyone in a similar position… I wish you the best of luck. It’s not easy and can be daunting at times but I’m sure it will be worth it!
All the best,
Michaela Haynes

Thanks so much for sharing your story with us Michaela. I wish you every blessing as you move into this new chapter of your life.

If you want to find out more about what she’s up to check out her website www.laughlearnlivelanguages.co.uk

Michaela and Laugh Learn Live Languages have been nominated for a Kalli Kids award. Vote for them
here
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