Tag Archives: French

Learning OR playing, why choose?

games

At Lingotastic we love languages and always on the lookout for resources that will help with language learning. My daughter was over the moon to be asked to review a game.

We were sent two of the products from the Pic’n Mix range, Little Fashionista and Smart Watch.

 

Packaging

They are in good solid packaging so much less likely to get damaged than in a cardboard box. The cute carry handle lends itself to a take out toy for the times a quiet toy is needed, like parent’s evening for the older children  or quiet church service. The toy  is made of durable plastic  pieces which stick together with velcro. A multilingual instruction booklet is included, the translations are likely not done by a native speaker, but on the whole is understandable.

Play of game

Little fashionista is a simple doll dressing game which can either be played by matching the pieces on the game card or dressing the boy or girl as you wish.

Smart Watch is a clock face with numbers, countable pictures and scenes from daily routine to match to times.

Educational use

As we played together with the Little Fashionista game we talked about what we saw and named the clothing in English, we talked about the weather that the clothes were suited for and moved on to naming the items of clothing in German and French. We talked about the colours of clothes in English, German and French.

 

As we played the Smart Watch game we started by assembling the clock face and identifying the numbers. I put the counting pieces on the clock face in random places and my  daughter swapped them for the correct numbers , we  then moved them to the correct places on the clock. We played in English and German. We talked about daily routine and put the pictures on the clock to best match her routine. We used the clock handles to tell the time in English and German.

The game has many opportunities for learning together through play, whatever the language. So learning OR playing, why choose?

 

I asked my daughter what she thought and  she said “I think they are really good and I liked to play with them.”

My thoughts as a mum and teacher are “I like their simplicity and versatility. I may have to borrow the games for my one to one classes.”

Would you like to get them for your little one?

Here are the links

Let us know how you use them to learn together.

We were sent this games by Pic’n Mix to review. The opinions in this article are our own.

 

Flash Academy – Have you joined?

If you follow me on Twitter you will know I’ve been asked to beta test the new sparkly Flash sticks app Flash Academy.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

If you’ll already know I’m a read my blogs or follow us on pinterest or Instagram you will know I am a big fan of FlashSticks sticky post it notes. They are colour coded to help you remember the gender of words. Blue for masculine, pink for feminine and yellow for verbs and adjectives. For a visual learner like me they are a godsend. Simply stick them around your home or take photos when you are out and about like me! You can use the new Flash Academy app to scan any note for an instant pronunciation video from a native speakers. This is an unlimited free feature for all users. We interviewed Veejay about how the idea for Flash Sticks came about last year, read about it here.

Our Lingotastic classes are in basic French, German and Spanish and occasionally Mandarin. It is a ongoing task to keep my skills going in all these languages. As a busy mum,  as well as a teacher my time is limited so I need to be able to learn in pockets of time and apps like this fit the bill for me.

 

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The app includes hundreds of short 5-minute interactive language lessons and a series of fast-paced (for me nail biting) word games to consolidate learning. Learners continually ‘graduate’ to new levels as their fluency in the language develops.

 

I like that the first words learned are food (breakfast) so useful words to learn. There are almost three hundred language lessons available for each language, with six lessons initially provided free of charge (five in basics, one in Food & Drink)

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The graphics are brightly coloured with appealing pictures. They remind me a lot of WII games! The words are spoken as they are seen by a native speaker, which is a big plus to me! I recently realised that, in my GCSE courses I learned ,to read and write much better than pronounce. This really helps to rectify this, as I can see it written, and hear it at the same time. The app also has occasional grammar and culture tips which are really useful to learn alongside the language.

I was interested how it worked for children, so I got my eight year old, who has only just started French to test it as well. She liked it and managed to understand the more complicated parts at the end.

wp-1469397847442.png

The only downside I found was, as an intermediate language learner I would like to assess where I am at and start from there. Flash Academy does not have that functionality.

 

The cherry on top of the app is the amazing sci fi object scanner. Simply switch on the object scanner and take a picture of the object and by some kind of magic the app tells you what it is in English and your chosen language of over 40 languages !

Anyway, what are you waiting for? Boost your family language skills AND have fun along the way!

 

The app is free to download on

App and Google Play stores, with subscription plans starting at £2.99 per month.

FlashAcademy is perfect for all ages and all language levels.

For more information visit www.flashacademyapp.com

Flash Sticks sticky notes are a really simple tool to increase your vocabulary in French, German, Spanish, Italian, BSL and English. (with more to come)
The guys at FlashSticks have offered Lingotastic customers a special discount.
10% off at Flash Sticks use the coupon code lingotastic10 (in lower case).

Disclaimer: These are my own thoughts and opinions. FlashSticks gave me a three month subscription in order to review this app which is just as well since I’ve found it to be addictive… What can I scan next?

 

 

By Toutatis – what a ride! At Parc Astérix

The chief!

The chief!

I don’t really have a bucket list as such, but if I had, then right at the top would have been a trip to Parc Astérix, just outside Paris. Ever since its opening back in 1989, I’ve been wanting to go. No idea why it’s taken me this long, but in any case the 27-year wait was worth it.

I think my indomitable wife, Sarah, only told half the story when she said about our Family Trip to Paris on a budget that it was really all my idea. No, the actual idea for the trip was the brainchild of our little book addict daughter (yes, the serial book reviewer you may remember from a couple of blogs). But of course when she announced she wanted to go to Paris, Dad was all for it, in order to finally meet his childhood hero Astérix.

I have to confess, I’ve read every The Mansions of The Gods “>Astérix book (in various languages), and watched every film. In fact, I’m quite excited that there seems to be a concerted effort to re-launch Astérix in the UK, with big names like Jack Whitehall, Catherine Tate and Dick & Dom providing voices for the most recent Asterix: Asterix: The Mansions Of The Gods [DVD]“>”The Mansions Of The Gods” movie. Yes, went to see it in Germany over a year ago already, but I wouldn’t want to miss the UK release for anything … but more on that in a later blog.

Back to Parc Astérix. When I first heard about it, I had only just started secondary school. Now with children of my own, there were many more reasons for going. Kids love theme parks, and for a polyglot family like ours, Parc Astérix was certainly a more genuinely French experience than the (according to feedback from other parents) overhyped and overpriced Disneyland Paris. We spent remarkably little time queuing, even the most popular rides (including Discobélix, a brand new ride which had only just opened) had a maximum of 15 minutes waiting time! Prices in general didn’t seem excessive, compared to what we’re used to from other theme parks, and getting there with the shuttle bus from CDG Airport was nice and easy.

wp-1465773300969.jpg

The biggest surprise, and one of my favourite attractions, was the sea lion & dolphin show. Absolutely amazing! As far as the rides are concerned, I was really impressed that there seemed to be plenty of options for different age groups: From high speed rollercoasters for the older thrillseekers, like Oziris, to family friendly rides and attraction for the “Young Gauls”, there is plenty to choose from. Finally, the spectacular live action show “Romains – Gaulois: Le Match” was a fitting and entertaining conclusion to our day at Parc Astérix

I think I’ll have to find a new excuse to ensure I won’t have to wait for our next visit as long as I had to for the first one!

Inspirational mum Mandie from Les Puces

IMG_0369 As a mum in business I love to celebrate what other amazing business mummies are doing. This month we meet the amazing Mandie Davis, the founder and creator of Les Puces Ltd, providing language classes to pre-school and primary aged children. So, without further ado, over to Mandie.

Imagine sitting in a café and at the next table is a young mum and her toddler.  The mum takes out a baby book of words and starts reciting verb conjugations to her little one.  “I go, you go, he goes ….”   She looks across at you and whispers “He just doesn’t seem to get it – he can recite verbs but not string a sentence together and he doesn’t seem to understand what I say.”  Your advice would undoubtedly be “Just talk to him!” a table

My daughters were brought up in Germany and France.  The eldest is trilingual and the youngest bilingual.  The only language lessons they had at school were to learn English!  They learned their new tongue by immersion, by simply imbibing the language until it became their own.  Let’s face it, communication isn’t just about words.  You can have a pretty good guess at what someone is saying to you based on the situation, context, the sound of their voice and their facial expressions, and so you slowly start to piece together this wonderful jigsaw of language.

When we teach our children their first language, they make errors as they grow. I remember the sweet mistakes made with words like hospital (hosbibal) and cheeks were always ‘sheeks’! As they grow, one turns to subtle corrections such as changing ‘they goed’ to ‘they went’ and eventually comes the exasperation on hearing ‘should of’ and explaining, one more time, that there is no verb ‘to of’! Group

So I have taken the same tack when forming the teaching modules for Les Puces Early Years French classes. Using 4 methods of learning – by rote; though songs, music and rhyme; through hearing gentle instructions when making something or colouring, where you can guess what to do; and through story telling with beautiful illustrations (and no words). These methods prepare a child for more formal lessons in school and they establish a good accent and ‘ear’ for the language while they are still young enough to be able to really hear the nuances.

I felt that communication was an imperative skill for my girls. It leads to confidence and an interrogative mind. As they grow to be young adults I trust that this also gives them understanding and tolerance of others; something becoming more important in the world we share.

To find out more about Les Puces Early Years French classes in your area please email mandie@lespuces.co.uk or go to out website www.lespuces.co.uk

Mandie Davis is the founder and creator of Les Puces Ltd, a provider of language classes for pre-school and primary aged children. Currently offering classes across Kent and Sussex, Les Puces have plans to expand across the UK and are about to launch in France, teaching English to French children.

AT Signature block V8

Mandie has created some brilliant resources, for sale through her shop.

Are you an inspirational mum who would like to feature in our blog? We’d love to hear more!

Can you learn languages in the bath?

duckCan you improve your family language skills in the bath?

Family language learning is rarely structured, just making the most of the different opportunities which arise, but can you improve language skills in the bath?

My daughters, really got to grips with their German colours after Oma sent some bath fizzers which colour the bath water. We would ask them what colour bath they would like and they had to answer in German. If they got it correct there was an immediate reward of a fun coloured bath. It worked really quickly for them!
We were sent something similar to try by the lovely ladies at funkydz

Bubbles are a brilliant way to engage and motivate children and get them speaking in another language in German they are called die Seifenblasen, we do it for a minute and then stop. The bubbles start again if they say “Nochmal” (again). They very quickly learned that word.

We LOVE to sing (well mummy anyway!) In the bath, garden and the high street (and sometimes to my childrens’ embarrassment in the supermarket) Singing in the bath is such a fun, silly way to bring languages in to the bathroom.
As you may have guessed German is our second language at home. A good German song to sing in the bath is “funf kleine Fische”- Five little fishes.Don’t forget to snap, snap, snap snap!

This would be brilliant to use with fishes and sharks in the bath (bath toys may work better than real ones!)

 

We’ve a few ducks in our bath (plastic ones of course) which we use to sing “Alle meine Entchen” -All my little duckings

German may be our second language, but that does not stop us having language learning fun in other languages too.
We’ve a few French songs we enjoy which involve boats and splashing. They are brilliant to sing in the bath.

We get out our boats for “Bateau sur l’eau” – boat on the water.

“Tapent tapent petit mains” – clap clap little hands

After the line about the fish swimming we add “et plouf dans l’eau” and splash in the water.

 

So, what are you waiting for? Run that bath, pour in the bubbles and get playing with languages together!

 

We were sent free samples of bath products by Funkydz to try at home. It sparked memories of our language learning adventures so I thought I’d share our stories as well as a link to buy your own.
http://www.funkydz.co.uk/

 

Do you know any good splashy songs in other languages ? Let me know in the comments below.

Why study abroad with Erasmus?

This week we have a guest post from the lovely Lily. Lily She has just completed her time in Portugal with the Erasmus programme. Lingotastic only exists because of the Erasmus programme, we met in the UK as native German Maik came over with the Erasmus programme. But, enough of our story, over to Lily…

lily sea

Hi I’m Lily and I’m a third year languages student. For the past nine months I have been studying in Portugal as part of the Erasmus programme for my degree. I’m studying French and Portuguese, and usually in the UK it is compulsory to spend the third year of your studies abroad in order to gain firsthand language experience before completing your final year back at your home institution. My university is slightly different in that it does not allow you to split the semesters between countries, so the summer vacations either side of the academic year are crucial if, like me, there’s a second language to maintain! So last summer I was an au pair for a family near Lausanne in Switzerland, and this July I will be following an intensive course in Lyon, France. Hopefully I haven’t forgotten everything!

Languages are unfortunately becoming less and less popular in the UK, as options for GCSEs and A-Levels, and many languages university departments have closed in recent years. It’s a real shame as I’ve found my degree to offer me great flexibility with ideas for the future and opportunities for study. I think I was extremely lucky to have had a truly passionate and engaging French teacher at secondary school for 5 years, and her dedication and inspiration helped me to pursue my eventual degree choice. My French classes at school were taught completely in the target language, and as we were all beginners, this was definitely like being thrown in at the deep end. However, it was certainly the most effective way for me to pick up my first second language, which was far more successful than my attempt with Spanish, the classes for which were taught in English.

When it came to choosing degree programmes, I knew French would figure in the mix in one way or another, and the great thing about most of the degree programmes on offer is that you can normally take a language as an elective module, so you can gain accreditation for language learning even if your degree is in maths or zoology. A joint honours language programme was the route I decided upon, and I chose to learn Portuguese ab initio, taking an accelerated course. Sometimes when I tell people what I study, they ask “why Portuguese?”, and I still don’t have a concrete answer. It’s partly because I wanted to learn a language that was a bit more niche and away from the usual European languages that are taught at schools (not that Portuguese is so very niche with over 200 million speakers worldwide, but still), and I also had hopes to spend the year abroad in Brazil, because it would coincide with the Olympics and I thought that would be a good plan. And saying you can speak Portuguese is normally a good conversation opener when you’re talking to people.

As you can imagine, learning a new language as well as starting university in a new city was quite overwhelming, but we all got there in the end! Because the course was accelerated, we learned most of the grammar and the intricacies of the language very quickly, and as a result my range of vocabulary was quite limited, but this was justified with the reasoning that the year abroad would help fill the gaps. I eventually chose to study in Coimbra, Portugal, mainly due to costs and a few other reasons that made staying closer to home more desirable at the time, and I’m so glad I came here! I’ve still got about a month left in which I need to finish some work and take my final lot of exams, but other than that it’s going to be a time to enjoy and relish my last days in Portugal. Erasmus is such a good opportunity for all students, not just linguists, to participate in, because you’re living in a new country with new people, and you’ve got to adapt pretty quickly to a new culture and vibe; my friend who is studying in Germany came to visit me and she said she had more culture shock coming to Portugal than when she first arrived in her host city. It’s not all coffee drinking and partying.

It’s not all coffee-drinking and partying

It’s not all coffee-drinking and partying

, as many people think Erasmus is (well, it is for some, but this academic year carries a lot of weighting for my final degree classification, so I have had to maintain some work ethic throughout), but there are infinite opportunities to meet people from all over the world, to travel to other countries and cities, and to become well acquainted with another city and country. I think I know more of Portugal than I do of the UK in all honesty now!

As far as I can tell, my language skills have improved, and I can hold a more natural conversation in Portuguese, which was my main goal. I certainly haven’t achieved fluency or anything like it, but I’m more competent and I can understand much more, which is all that I could have asked for. Sure sometimes I can share a joke and laugh with the postman, and other times the waiter can’t really understand what I’m trying to order, but it’s swings and roundabouts, which is what I’ve come to expect with language learning. Also, I’ve developed a genuine love for my third language, which is great, because before I came here my relationship with Portuguese was slightly more love-hate, depending on how well my revision was going on a particular day. I would certainly recommend the Erasmus experience to everyone, even just taking a couple weeks out of the year to study a course somewhere abroad would be a great experience for anyone. It’s the best thing I’ve done in my life so far – I know I’m only young! – and I cannot recommend it enough.

Lily has completed her time in Coimbra, Portugal and in now in Lyon France improving her French. Follow her adventures on Lily has a blog.

Lily group

How did you boost you language skills? Let us know in the comments below, you could even be our next guest blogger!

Family trip to Paris on a budget.

wp-1465678138152.jpgAs a family of five travelling is an expensive business. We had a brilliant time in Paris on a budget. We’ll share with you our secrets so you can do the same. We think travelling is great way to encourage learning languages and we learned and used a of French on that trip Language learning a Paris

Eurostar
As a family of five travelling is an expensive business. We often opt to drive when travelling in Europe but I did not relish driving in Paris so we found a good deal for Eurostar. The week we travelled there were petrol blockades and airtraffic controllers strikes so we were very pleased to have chosen Eurostar! Before we even booked we checked out money saving expert so we booked a long way in advance.
As our girls are still fairly small, toilet trips can be numerous and so expensive. Before we went away we downloaded the find free toilets in Paris app to have on Google Play or iTunes. There were self cleaning toilets by the Eifel tower and in many public places.There are 400 free self-cleaning sanisettes throughout Paris. We had a long queue at the one at the Eiffel Tower as many none French readers pressed the emergency door release to try shut the door which meant the toilet went through a cleaning cycle so we all had to wait again!

Champs Elysees

As there are many sights on Paris we decided to book in an open top bus tour l’open tour Very touristy I know. When we began to price it up we realised it only cost a few euros extra for another day. The first day we took the main route and stopped of at a few spots. The following day we took a different route to see a few more of the many sights. It was a wet few days so the open top tour was not ideal for the weather! The view from the top was brilliant though so worth getting a bit wet and cold at times.

The other days, we used the Metro to get around and a carnet of 10 tickets worked well for us (with five in our family that was only a there and back.) Buy at any Metro station for €14.10, saving €3.90 on buying individually.

Eating out is quite expensive for five so an apartment with a kitchen was high on our priorities list. Buying food in local shops is a real authentic experience and great for everyone to use their French skills. We had a few supermarkets and bakeries near the apartment which was brilliant. We were so pleased to be able to buy nice bread for breakfast and to make a picnic for each day so saving money and hassle of finding food when out for the day.2 CV bed

We were really excited to find Le Loft apartment in near Saint Denis stadium. It was really easy access into the centre and a fun quirky apartment with a kitchen. Yes, that is a 2CV bed, our girls loved it! Check out the website for a look at the eye popping fun decor. It’s location is close to Gare du Nord so great for access to Parc Asterix and Disneyland . The other quirky fun family apartments owned by the same guy are Paris Champion Paris Circus

Finally meeting Asterix

Finally meeting Asterix


I think the REAL reason we went to Paris is because Maik, my hubby had wanted to visit Parc Asterix for the last twenty five years! We booked tickets a long way in advance and took the bus from CDG airport as this was the best price and running regularly. Tickets are easy to buy at the airport. We wished we’d have gone for the flexible option with booking parc tickets as the SNCF were striking that day and the trains were rammed! Parc Asterix was lot of fun (I’m not really a fan of theme parks, so high praise indeed from me). It felt like good value for money as there was a really fun dolphin show, a multisensory, multilevel, multimedia competition between the Romans and the Gauls as well as all the rides with short queues.

I hope these tips inspire you to visit Paris with your family (and improve your French). Do you have any top tips on traveling to Paris with your family? Let us know in the comments below.

Cooking, Carafes and learning Italian

We’ve a brillant guest blog from Kate at Cooking and Carafes She talks about her experience of learning Italian both at home, and in the country.
1278012_10151849279448211_302018913_o

I’ve always liked languages, when I was little we used to holiday to Spain and I always had my hands on the phrase book. I would be learning the basics myself and then would endlessly recite numbers, days of the week and other basic phrases to my parents. I enjoyed learning languages at secondary school but French and German didn’t have the same affinity with me as Italian (which wasn’t an option to study). Although I studied Latin which I’m certain built the perfect foundations for when I later went on to learn Italian.

From the age of 10 we started to go on family holidays to Italy and that’s where my love affair with this beautifully romantic language began. Not only did I fall in love with the country; the scenery, the people, the food, the hand gestures, and the list goes on… but the language too.

Italians are so passionate, I used to watch them speaking to one another, gesturing, emphasising some phrases over others and thinking ‘I wish I knew what they were saying’. So once again I began with the phrase book and as holidays became more frequent both my mum and my sister took up Italian evening classes so I would use their books to teach myself.

I taught myself a fair amount and would use the books and the tapes/CDs to help me. When I went to university I got the chance to study Italian as one of my modules on my course. It was by far my favourite subject, so much so I got a First in this particular module. We had a great teacher, Claudio – he made learning enjoyable and fun and would take his time when you needed help.

After uni, I couldn’t contain my desire to travel and learn a language any longer, so in the midst of not knowing what I was going to do once I completed my degree I applied for jobs as a holiday rep in Italy. I was lucky enough to land myself a job with Citalia based on the beautiful island of Sardinia. I thought I’d hit the jackpot… and I had!

1917307_106921618210_3927114_n

That summer I flew out to Italy and completed my training in the town where my love for the country first began, Sorrento (near Naples). After a few weeks there I flew to Cagliari (an airport that would soon become my weekly hangout with new arrivals and departures!) and was based in the south of Sardinia in a little town called Pula on the coast of Santa Margherita di Pula about 45 minutes from the island’s capital.
Here is where my real language learning journey began…

I moved into my own apartment, right in the heart of Pula, Piazza del Popolo and lived next to a delightful older couple Angioletta and her husband. They ran a small souvenirs shop next door, she would greet me every morning and evening…Piccolina! And would continue to talk to me at a rate of knots in Italian, I didn’t understand a word! In the first few days of being on my own this is when I realised to enjoy this I had to embrace the language. So I began slowly; può parlare più lentamente per favore became my favourite phrase, and the more I tried, the more I learnt.

Sardinia is more popular with German and Italian tourists so although a lot of my friends spoke English it wasn’t as good as some of their other languages. I immersed myself in their culture, I would spend evenings with friends and I would be the only English person so naturally they mainly spoke Italian and the more words I heard and the more I asked what they meant, they slowly began to stick. You learn familiar conversations and can start responding more easily, learning key phrases and words and more importantly how to piece them together – this was a turning point to being able to engage in conversation.

My real time to practice was on my coach journeys to and from the airport, as a lot of my friends worked in hotels or bars so knew English, just some weren’t as confident or as fluent as they were in other languages. However, my coach drivers were all Sardinian so if anything they just spoke more Sard (the island’s dialect), so each week I would have two return transfers with different drivers so I would practice my Italian with them and then when a flight was delayed we’d teach each other over un cafe in the airport’s bar. They would try to get me to learn their dialect and to this day I think I still only know a few phrases one of which was Comme menti staisi? How are you? Which in Italian is Come stai?

I could sit here and regale many moments of learning Italian in Sardinia… like when the concierge from one of my hotels helped me on my first day and I thought he didn’t speak any English so the entire time he let me muddle my way through broken Italian… later on I found out he was fluent, he also turned out to be one of my best friends!
Once I returned home at the end of my season my heart was heavy with love for ‘my’ beautiful island, its people, its culture and my desire to keep speaking Italian.

I continued with a few local lessons and then one to one lessons with local Italian Romilda who was wonderful – her enthusiasm and confidence in me knew no bounds. Unfortunately work and day to day life got in the way and my Italian dwindled.

1917307_106921973210_607100_n
A few trips to Italy though and it’s amazing what comes back to you in a short space of time, you only have to hear a word once and it comes back so easily. Now with another holiday on the horizon (to ‘my island’) it’s motivated me to refresh my language skills so I’m using the app Babbel at the moment which is brilliant as it works on repetition and across writing, speaking and listening, along with grammar modules and all at various levels.

Obviously language learning has moved on in the last 20 years since I was at Secondary school, you can now access more tools to help you learn. The internet and smartphones have transformed learning a language, and at the touch of a button you can look up words on a smart phone with Google translate, use an app to help you learn, read articles in different languages, speak to friends in other countries more easily using skype/facetime and messaging services like whatsapp and so on.

However you decide to learn whether it’s at a local college’s evening class or within an online community or in the country itself, it will help build confidence when conversing in other languages, whether it’s on holiday or for business. Learning a new language is hugely rewarding and will also help stimulate your mind so why not start learning a new language today!

My love for Italy has continued, mainly with my love of their food and wine so check out my Italian recipes ideas and wine reviews at www.cookingandcarafes.co.uk

Language learning à Paris

Language learning à Paris

If you follow us on twitter and Facebook you will know Pascal our French puppet has been out and about in Paris during May half term. Can you guess what he saw?

Our nine year old had been asking to go to Paris for a while. We found a good deal on the Eurostar and the most amazing apartment, Le Loft at Chez Bertrand.We’ll be posting a blog soon about our tips for visiting Paris with children.

wp-1465678662535.jpg

As you can see we had a lot of fun seeing the sights. As a family of language learners, of course we had to learn or improve our French as well. Hearing and reading so much French meant us grown ups were using it much more than usual. I realised when crossing the road I automaticly gave instructions in French “Vite!” “Allons-y!” “On y va” The children responded as if they understood. The girls were reading on the Metro “Sortie” Whilst looking around Notre Dame my youngest daughter said “that sortie is closed”.
After a busy day my daughter came home and flopped on the bed. Daddy asked “Est-ce que tu est fatiguée?” My daughter thought this was a very silly word so often said “I’m fatiguée” and “Je suis fatiguée”. Our son has studied French to year 9 and I was surprised how much he used on holiday, as his last school French lesson was two years ago.

Each morning We went to la boulangerie to buy le pain. The children helped write the shopping list. Les bonbons was their favorite thing to write. It was not all unhealthy though. My daughters found some apples with stickers to decorate them “tête du Pomme” I’ve not seen them enjoying apples so much before. In the supermarket the girls were really excited to find l’escargot. Strangely enough, they did not fancy eating them.

wp-1465679932598.jpg

We toured the notable landmarks in Paris and heard others speaking French. The children were really excited to see the famous landmarks in real life. Our Jasmin was so excited about the Eiffel tower I thought she may pop! As you may see from the pictures it was a very wet few days, one day it was so damp we could not see the top of the Eiffel tower and the Seine was close to bursting it’s banks. A few days later The Louvre was closed to move priceless paintings up a floor to safely and the Notre Dame was also at risk of flooding.

We visited Parc Asterix which Maik had wanted to visit for 25 years. We had a lot of fun and read and heard a lot of French there. The rides were really good for all our ages. We’ll tell you a lot more in a blog so stay tuned.

When in Paris we stumbled upon an amazing museum of Language and linguistics called Mundolingua. It was just up our street and really interactive so the kids enjoyed it as well. We could have spent much longer there than we did. It was huge fun and we’ll have a blog all about it on the way.

wp-1465678936532.jpg

Our time in Paris was a great boost to all our families French learning and gave them us real life examples to hang our language learning on.

What langauges are you learning as a family? Have you visited the country to help achieve this? We’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

Inspirational mum Anna from Kidslingo

This is the first in a series of interviews celebrating inspirational mums in business.rabbitThis week we have an interview with an inspirational mum Anna from Kidslingo.

Hi Anna, could you tell us a little about yourself and your family?
I am a Mum to 2 young, very active children – aged 6 & 9. They are into all sorts of activities including gymnastics, netball, swimming and Brownies & Beavers – so after-school is a busy time!
I initially did a language degree and then went into working in marketing & advertising – first in London and then in the West Midlands.

Why did you decide to launch your business?
After the arrival of my 2nd child I reassessed my career options as I needed something that was much more flexible and that could fit around the demands of a young family – nursery and school drop offs and pick-ups, as well as after school activities.
Also I missed using my language skills and really wanted to work with children. I looked at various options including teacher training & other franchises. I then decided that I could do it better myself and started up on my own teaching a few local classes and have never looked back! We now have over 30 franchisees and are growing by the month. parachute and scarves

Could you tell us a little about your business?
Our whole approach & philosophy is all about fun language learning for kids. We use songs games, actions, dance, story-telling & drama to bring the language to life & inspire our little learners and linguists of tomorrow. We have programmes starting at birth and continuing right through to the end of primary school at age 11. This covers everything from parent & baby classes, preschool classes in hired venues or nurseries and clubs and classes in primary school for KS1 & KS2. We offer a full franchise package to people – from initial training, ongoing help and support, all of the lesson plans, music, resources, marketing pack & loads more!

How are you finding it fits in your family?
Perfectly – I drop off every morning, pick up & take the kids to their activities. Having a smart phone means you are accessible anywhere. After bed time I get the laptop out again & work begins for the evening! I miss out on some downtime in the evening but I gain by the time I can spend with the kids.

Anything else you’d like to tell our readers?

We’d love to chat to you if you think this type of thing could be interesting for you. Anna from Kidslingo.

« Older Entries Recent Entries »