Tag Archives: Indonesian

Mondly -a review

I’m a great fan of gamified learning. As I’m trying to keep making progress in German, French and Spanish as well as being a busy self employed mum it needs to be fun!
Mondly is a gamified app available I Phone, I Pad , Android and and online on Mondly.com. It costs $47.99 for a year giving access to 800 lessons and 33 languages.
I came across Mondly about two months ago. I was fascinated by idea of the chatbot. Cat Spanish app had a conversation section but not one with so much freedom.
I’ve been testing it out for six weeks and a really enjoying it. My hubby and children have been enjoying it too. My nine year old enjoyed it but found it challenging. The learning is split into themed chapters 8 units to build on and a conversation at the end to use the vocabulary learned. It has a fairly comprehensive range topics so lots of vocubulary you can learn.
The website has an amazing number of languages(34). It includes Finnish, Croatian, Hindi, Greek, Farsi, Bulgarian, Hungarian, Afrikaans, Czech, Romanian, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Hebrew, Japanese, Korean and even Chinese. Of course you can learn the popular languages like German, Spanish, French and Italian. Great for a compulsive Polyglot like me.
What is unique about this app is the chatbot. Here’s what Alexandru Iliescu, co-founder and CEO of ATi Studios said “The best way to learn a new language is to build your confidence with practice. We’ve taken chatbot technology and combined it with a speech recognition platform then added our own object recognition system. The result is that we’ve created something that is fun, useful and unique for language learners. This new feature is truly a revolutionary new way to learn a new language and we’re proud that Mondly is the first to do it.”
So what did we think? I’ve listed the pros and cons below to help you make your own mind up.

 

Pros
The site uses native speakers and the voice recordings are excellent.
lt is a mixture of hearing and speaking to learn in different ways.
As a busy mum I really appreciate the short lessons so I can fit language learning into the small pockets of time I have.
As I have four languages to keep going games which allow me practice French from Spanish, or French from German are a huge advantage to me.
I like that the progress made transfers from the device to the computer so it can be easily used on both devices, not something I’ve come across before.
I love the daily quiz to keep you coming back and a notification that comes up each day to remind you to play.
The chatbot is a lot of fun I found myself giving none standard answers to catch it out which is great for your language practice.
I like the to see daily progress on a chart. I like the way the different chapters are shown as a journey. It makes me feel I’m progressing so encourages me to keep going.
My initial thoughts were that it is good as part of a language learning plan, but not enough on its own.
I was not convinced that there was enough spaced repetition but I seem to be learning so maybe I was wrong about that.

 

Cons
It would be much better if it showed the gender of words. English speakers often forget about these. I did not see the value myself at school. Difficult to learn in addition later. (maybe colour code like flash sticks)
Was doing it on a train in London it was fine at stations but cut out inbetween Does not work without wi fi so not great to use when commuting!

Unlike some other gamified learning you have to pay if you want to have all the features. However it is not expensive when you bear in mind all the languages offered.
In my opinion there is not one way to best learn a language. It is a combination of things you can play, watch, read and sing along too which builds your language learning. I think Mondly fits well into that. Try it for yourself and let me know what you think! https://www.mondlylanguages.com/

 

Disclaimer:
I was given free access to the site in exchange for an honest review.

Polyglots Assemble!

Polyglot bagWhat’s a polyglot anyway? That’s the question most of my (monolingual) friends asked me when I tried to explain to them why I was heading to Berlin for an extended weekend. I was one of 357 participants from more than 40 countries who converged onto the German capital from 5th to 8th May 2016 for the third annual Polyglot gathering. In case you wonder, Polyglot simply means “many languages”, and it’s difficult to estimate just how many languages were spoken during the four days of the event, several dozen at least, including the likes of Esperanto, Toki Pona and even Latin!
It was a very early start for me on the Thursday, getting up at 2:30 to catch a 6am flight. Thankfully I only had hand luggage so this saved some time, although regrettably it limited the amount of books I could bring back! The early start was worth it though – just being around people who share the same enthusiasm for languages is an experience difficult to put into words. And my own journey paled in comparison when I realised a couple of people had come all the way from the USA for the event.
We were absolutely spoilt for choice with the seminars on offer. Some were introductions to languages such as Greek (the modern rather than the ancient version), Indonesian, Turkish and Welsh. Polyglots are always looking for the next language to learn. Other seminars covered different aspects of life as a polyglot, as well as the process of language learning. A lot of the seminars were in English, but some were delivered in Italian, French, Esperanto and one even completely in Latin by Roberto Salazar!
In fact, as I’ve been devoting some time on reviving my “dormant” Latin recently, I was really pleased about the seminars on “Does it Make Sense to Speak a Dead Language” and “Rudimenta Latini Sermonis – Spoken Latin 101”. I must have been doing something right, as I could follow the Latin seminar – in Latin – without problems.
The seminar I got most from was – strangely enough –in a language I don’t really speak: “Storytelling in Language Learning”, delivered entirely in Italian by the amazing Antonio Libertino. I was pleased that my knowledge of Latin, French and Spanish somehow combined to help me follow what was going on. This seminar fitted really well with what we do in Lingotastic, so I was determined to get the most out of it, never mind the language used.
The biggest surprise of the weekend was just how popular Esperanto is as a language in the polyglot community. We all wore name badges with little stickers of flags identifying which languages we speak, and at what level (see picture). And almost everyone was speaking Esperanto at some level. The lovely Charlotte Scherping even delivered a whole talk on “Comparing the 3 easiest languages” entirely in Esperanto, having only learnt the language for a little over 4 months.
Badge
What was also encouraging was the mix of aspiring polyglots with “only” three languages on their badge, and those who clearly needed a larger badge to fit all of theirs on!
It was great to chat in person to many of the people whose blogs and podcasts I follow. It was a good place to network. I was particularly pleased to meet Jimmy Mello and to come away with his book Jimmy Mello. We sung with him in our Muppets Christmas Carol video, put together by Lindsay

It was incredible to have so many experts in one place. I took lots of notes and will be learning from the seminars for a while yet.

Language legend Lindsay has produced five amazing videos so you can watch the highlights of the Polyglot Gathering in the comfort of your own home (or wherever you are at this moment)

Why learn languages?

This week my friend Teddy Nee from Nee’s language blog talks about the value of learning languages

“Why should you bother learning another language when you already know English?”
Someone might have ever asked this question to you before, and how did you react to it? Or let’s assume nobody had asked this question to you, how would you answer it when you are asked?

I was frequently asked by either my friends or acquaintances why do you learn languages. They know and we all know that I know English because if you can understand this text, it means that I know English. Having been asked that question, I have only one answer, “Not everyone is eager to speak English or can express themselves well in English.”

We should accept the fact that nowadays we can get information from other countries in other languages much easier than, let’s say, 20 years ago. It mainly because of the internet. The internet has really changed our way of life, and it even has created so many jobs that weren’t existed before. I work as an IT engineer, and it is not easy to explain about what I really do to my parents, or even to my grandparents because what I am doing did not exist in their time when they were at my age.

So, this easy access to information has caused globalization to happen where companies can establish partnership with overseas companies, and have the ability to expand their market even to much larger scope, not to mention inter countries, but inter continents.

English pic

English as a universal language
English language which originated from England has apparently became a universal language that two persons from different countries would use to communicate unconsciously because they thought English is supposed to be the language that everyone understands for international communication.

If you often gather information from the internet, you must have realized that most contents are available in English. Therefore, if you know English, you can get much more information that those who don’t know English. That’s the fact! However, I need to remind you that there is still limitation for using English to search for information, especially if the information is more personal that only speakers of the original language could have the privilege for the access.

TeddyGroup

Taking part in an international community
When we discuss about a universal language, a question might occur in mind, that is “What is a truly universal language?” and “How do we define a universal language?”. The United Nations even has 6 official languages — English, Mandarin, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Russian. We might also be intrigued to talk about a constructed language for international communication, Esperanto.

Esperanto speakers around the world have been vigorously promoting Esperanto as the language for international communication. Nowadays, we can see many activities done in Esperanto, such as activities related to education, charity, science research, journalism, commerce, and so on. Although there are quite a lot of people who are still pessimistic and skeptical about Esperanto language being a human communication tool.

We need to have more knowledge about other language in order to get access to much more information, and to be able to get to know more people from other countries, especially those who don’t speak English or our languages. On top of that, language learning is like an investment. Spending a little time and effort to learn a language that you could use for your whole life doesn’t seem to be a big deal.

Books

Choosing a language to learn
When you search for, let’s say, top 10 most favorited languages in the world, top 10 languages with the most speakers, top 10 languages for job seekers, etc. you can get abundant of results. The most important is to know your goal, whether you want to learn the language because there is more job opportunities in your area or you want to learn the language that is completely different from that you have known or you want to learn a language that is similar with that you have known. Deciding the goal is the very first thing you need to do.

If you like challenge, you should choose to learn language from other language family. For example, if you know English, you can pick Hindi, Mandarin or Russian as your target language. If you want to quickly reach higher level of understanding in other language, you should choose to learn language from the same language family. For example, if you know Spanish, you can choose to learn Italian, Portuguese or French.

There is actually a rule of thumb that many language courses don’t teach you. If you want to impress your friends with the amount of languages that you know, learn languages from the same family group because they share so many similarities that you even already can understand a big portion of it without learning. Thus, it is not surprising to know a someone who knows 5-6 languages but those languages are from the same language family.

Depending on your geographical location, some languages might not be useful. Let’s say you will spend some months in Latin America. Your focus should be Spanish rather than Japanese, and perhaps, the second language could be Portuguese. However, any languages will likely be useful if your activities are internet-based since the majority of people around the world have had access to internet nowadays.

So I ask again. Why learn languages? Knowing more languages is always beneficial. Apart from giving you more opportunities to enjoy what speakers of those languages can enjoy, you can also enrich yourself by broaden your viewpoint and increasing your skills. Learning language also trains your brain and it certainly increase your intelligence. No wonder, many articles state the benefits of knowing more languages as if there is no downside of it.

Teddy loves to learn languages.

Teddy loves to learn languages.

Teddy Nee is a passionate language learner and blogger. An IT Engineer by day and a language learner by night. His mission is to raise awareness of the importance of knowing more languages and to educate more people to be global citizens. He believes that learning the language of the others is a milestone to reach world peace. You can correspond with him in Medan Hokkien, Indonesian, English, Chinese Mandarin, Spanish, and Esperanto. Visit his blog at Nee’s language blog.

Teddy’s Tips for language learning.

This week we’re lucky to have an interview with Teddy Nee’s Language Blog
Teddy is a native of Medan city, Indonesia, who loves writing as much as language learning.Teddy Pic

Hi Teddy, I’ve enjoyed reading your blog for a while now. Could you tell us a little about your language learning journey?
My language learning journey began at a very early age, on my Sundays visit to my grandma, who speaks Cantonese natively apart from Indonesian and Hokkien. I speak only the latter two as native languages.
All students learn English as primary language subject at school, and luckily, the school I attended also offered Chinese Mandarin, Japanese, and German. The latter two are optional subjects, and I chose German over Japanese thinking that I could learn it faster because of its origin from the same language family with English.
I did not realize my interest in foreign language until I went to the university to study in an international program, where students come from many countries around the world. Since the beginning semester, I felt a stronger and stronger emotion with foreign languages, especially when I could speak it with international students.
Nelson Mandela once quoted “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language,that goes to his heart.” This quote also motivated me to learn foreign language in order to understand other culture from a different perspective.

What do you think is a good reason to learn a language?
Some language learners claimed that economic factor is the learning motivation, or heritage factor for some others. I always believe that one can be benefited by knowing foreign languages, no matter directly or indirectly. Language learning has become my hobby rather than school assignments or job requirements, and it will be what it is indefinitely because language learning is fun and easy. Everyone can learn languages successfully as they know themselves better than anyone else.

Thanks Teddy. I look forward to speaking to you again soon.