Tag Archives: Music

Song translating fun.

Savez-vous-planter-les-chouxThe songs we use in our classes are a mix of those familiar English nursery rhymes and songs like Incy Wincy spider and traditional songs in the target language to help the families appreciate that culture. We have a few French songs I’d love to use but we’ve not yet got English translations that can be sung to the same tune to help introduce the song. We’re also starting working on our French CD so it all becomes a bit more urgent!

We were sat round the table having Sunday tea and I asked my family for ideas. This is how it went…

The first song was Mernier tu dors

Meunier, tu dors, (mime sleeping)
Ton moulin, va trop vite. (roll arms)
Meunier, tu dors, (mime sleeping)
Ton moulin, va trop fort
Ton moulin, ton moulin (roll arms faster)
Va trop vite
Ton moulin, ton moulin (roll arms backwards)
Va trop fort.
Ton moulin, ton moulin
Va trop vite
Ton moulin, ton moulin
Va trop fort.

My eight year old started and after five minutes we had this translation which can be sung and keeps the feel of the song.

Miller, wake up
The wind it is blowing
Miller, wake up.
The wind it is strong.

Your windmill, your windmill,
It is too fast.
Your windmill, your windmill,
is too strong.
Your windmill, your windmill,
It is too fast.
Your windmill your windmill,
is too strong.

It you don’t know the song here is a live version we recorded last year.

This second song, I’ve wanted to use for ages. It has a fun tune, is silly and is a great way to learn body parts. It must be fairly old as my mum learned it at school!

Savez-vous planter les choux
À la mode, à la mode
Savez-vous planter les choux
À la mode de chez nous

On les plante avec les pieds
À la mode, à la mode
On les plante avec les pieds
À la mode de chez nous

On les plante avec le genou
À la mode, à la mode
On les plante avec le genou
À la mode de chez nous

On les plante avec le nez
À la mode, à la mode
On les plante avec le nez
À la mode de chez nous

On les plante avec le coude
À la mode, à la mode
On les plante avec le coude
À la mode de chez nous

The google translate of this is hilarious !

“Do you plant cabbage
Fashionable, trendy
Do you plant cabbage
The way we do it at home”

After a few minutes we came up with.

Cabbage planting is such fun
Like we do it, like we do it.
Cabbage planting is such fun,
Like we do it, come along.

We can plant it with our feet,
Like we do it, like we do it.
We can plant it with our feet,
Like we do it, come along.

We can plant it with our knee,
Like we do it, like we do it.
We can plant it with our knee,
Like we do it, come along.

We can plant it with our nose,
Like we do it, like we do it.
We can plant it with our nose
Like we do it, come along.

We can plant it with our elbow,
Like we do it, like we do it.
We can plant it with our elbow
Like we do it, come along.

Next term’s French class we’ll be reading “la petit poule rousse” The little red hen. We’ll finally we using this song.

I need to find a cabbage prop! Any ideas where?

Do you use songs in your language learning? Do you have fun translating them. Let me know in the comments below.

Learn to sing Twinkle Twinkle in five languages

Love singing? Join us to learn to sing Twinkle twinkle in five languages. You’ll be a polyglot before you know it!

In English

In German

In Spanish

In Esperanto

In Mandarin

You may notice the translations have slightly different meanings. Song translation is tricky. We tend to go with the feeling of the song and flow over direct translation.

Which language do you prefer to sing it in? Let us know in the comments below.

The single best resource for your language learning!

This week we’ve got another guest post from Maik (@lingotutor)
Okay, I admit it. I like Amazon … a lot. Or to be more specific, I like the wealth of resources they put at my fingertips as a language learner. So let me be upfront about this: I think the single best language learning resource is Amazon Prime and signing up for Amazon Prime is a no-brainer. And here’s why.

 

Physical language learning books

I’ve needed to buy a good number of language learning books in the last few months, either as a resource to use for language tuition, or to refresh / improve my own language skills. Currently I’m brushing up on Latin which I’ve not used since my school days over twenty years ago. But there’s no need to go for a brand-new book every time (although I love the smell of a new book, I’m weird like that!). So most of my purchases were sub-£3 second hand copies, which could still be in my hands the very next day thanks to free next day delivery with Amazon Prime. You’d pay more than £3 for just the delivery charge elsewhere!

 

Le tour du monde en 80 jours

Le tour du monde en 80 jours

eBooks

Sometimes I’m too impatient to wait for next-day delivery, which is when eBooks come in handy. The great thing is that there are so many free eBooks available in various languages. In French for example, you could be reading “Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours” by Jules Verne or “Le Chien des Baskerville” by Arthur Conan Doyle at no charge at all.

The choice is even wider if you have an Amazon Prime membership, as you’ll automatically benefit from the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library, which lets you chose from a vast number of eBooks. You can chose a new book each month, provided you “return” your previous one. My personal favourites recently have been “The A-Z of Learning German” and “Learn German for Your Holidays” by the amazing Angelika Davey (review to follow).

The only drawback is that, as the name suggests, the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library is only available to you if you own either a Kindle eReaderor Fire tablet. If you don’t, you’ve got two options:

(1) Sign up for Kindle Unlimited, which allows you to read as much as you want on any device or

(2) Get yourself a Kindle eReaderor Fire tablet. They’re seriously awesome and with the benefit of the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library basically pay for themselves within 7 months.

Chinese Children's Classics

Chinese Children’s Classics

Prime Music

Okay, the selection here is not (yet) as wide as on Spotify or Deezer, but there is a lot of quality stuff here, especially for the language learner. One of our family favourites is “Chinese Children’s Classics” by A Little Mandarin. And there’s not just music, as the name suggests, but a good number of spoken language courses, including my personal favourite: the “Learn in your car” series. It’s a great way to fit language learning into your commute, and as a Prime member, you have access to Spanish, French, Italian, Mandarin, Russian and German courses at no charge. The CD versions would easily set you back £20 each.

Fire TV Stick

Although there used to be a good number of Foreign Language films available on Amazon Instant Video, including the hilarious “7 Zwerge” (again free to Prime members), they are now few and far between. But I still use the Fire TV Stick a lot for watching language stuff from YouTube on the big screen of my telly rather than the smaller phone or tablet screens. And the Prime membership does come in handy when I’m taking a break from language learning to watch “The Imitation Game” or “Paddington”. Not to mention that I’m ready for Clarkson, Hammond and May next year, now that they’ve left the BBC’s Top Gear and have signed with Amazon instead.

The Top Gear Trio on Amazon Prime

The Top Gear Trio on Amazon Prime

So, as you can see, our Prime membership gets used A LOT. Mostly, but not exclusively for language learning. I think it’s a must for every language learning enthusiast, and now is probably the best time to sign up. You get a month’s free trial anyway, and the free next day delivery is incredibly useful in the run-up to Christmas. Best of all, if you sign up through the link below, you’ll help us bring more language learning awesomeness to you in the future. What’s not to like? So go ahead, you know you want to 🙂

Try Amazon Prime free for a month!

Our birthday, NEW CD and holiday classes

This week has been so exciting I may pop!

It is two years since our first EVER class. A free trial at Chesham library.

laterneumzug

It’s been an exciting two years, going from one class a week to four.

Watching some gorgeous little ones grow up and saying goodbye as some move on to school.

Connecting with some amazing language enthusiasts, language businesses and language teachers both in the virtual world and the real world as we’ve met up at Language Show live.

The class (and business) is very different to when we started out with many more props, puppets and bubbles not to mention our own custom made rockets and floor mats designed and made by the amazing Emily Kane

Thanks to all of you who have come along and made the classes so much fun.

Happy Birthday Lingotastic!

Our biggest news is the launch of our first CD- mostly German

It has been a lot of fun to record, which I’m sure you’ll hear!

Lingo_web_CD

Our CD will be available to buy in classes from 14th December, at our special Christmas holiday class and in our online shop.

You will be able to preorder from Saturday 5th on our shop www.Lingotastic.co.uk/shop
Stay tuned for our special pre release offer.

It is great stocking filler and perfect timing ready for the German term in the New Year! You’ll be singing along in the car and at home and picking up lots of German (and a few words in other languages too!)

20131216_113759000_iOS

As I mentioned before we have our Christmas holiday class coming up on 21st December. 10 am at the Chesham venue 188 Severalls Ave.
We’ll be blasting off to Spain, meeting los tres reyes (the three kings) and joining their journey following the star (la estrella) and singing some brilliant Christmas songs like Feliz Navidad. We’ve a brilliant craft too with some really gorgeous craft materials.

It’s a great way to start the Christmas holiday!

If you don’t know Feliz Navidad already, learn it with us!

Shop

Lingo_web_CD

Our new “Mostly German” CD is on sale now.

Singing is a really powerful tool in language learning, research is now showing. In singing you pick up the sounds of a language and quickly join in yourself. By bypassing the analytical part of the brain, you quickly acquire a good accent. This works for grown ups as well as children. When singing, you are no longer limited by grammar tables and vocab lists, free to enjoy the language and learn along the way.

For little ones, it’s an amazing foundation in language learning and the start of a bright future. We’ve seen this time and time again in our classes and now you can enjoy it at home too, with the most popular songs from our German classes. Most of these songs have not been translated into English before. We’ve also included verses in French, Spanish, Mandarin and Esperanto. Contrary to popular belief this does not confuse language learners (big and small) but actually helps language acquisition.Though these songs may be children’s songs, adults will enjoy singing along too.

Get your own copy, and see how much fun language learning can be!

We’ve been enjoying it as a family in the car this weekend. Bopping along to “Grün Grün Grün / Green, green, green”, hopping with the bunnies with “Häschen in der Grube/ Bunny in the burrow” and riding our bus with “Die Räder am Bus”. My kids keep requesting it which is a seal of approval to me!

This has been our school run sound track for the past two weeks. It’s packed with catchy tunes in “mostly” German but there’s a bit of French, Spanish and even some Chinese too. We’re getting quite good! – Kate Eccles

The CD is only £10.

It’s a great present and a fantastic family language learning tool.

Postage within the UK is an extra £1.99, if you are further afield then please Contact Us. CD will be given to you at that class or before if you are already at weekly classes.

Want to sing along to Mostly German?

 

 

 

 

Checkout

 

 

 

 

Track listing

Guten Morgen/ Lingotastic welcome song (German, French, Spanish & Mandarin)

Häschen in der Grube/ Bunny in the burrow (German & English)

Summ, summ, summ/ Buzz, buzz, buzz (German & English)

Frère Jacques/ Brother John (French, German, Spanish & English)

Grün Grün Grün/ Green, green, green (English & German)

Hopp, hopp, hopp/ Hop, hop, hop (German & English)

Die Räder am Bus/ The wheels on the bus (English & German)

Alle meine Entchen/ All my little ducklings (German & English)

Blinke, blinke, kleiner Stern/ Twinkle twinkle little star (German, English, Spanish, Mandarin & Esperanto)

 

 

Here are some of our favourite Spanish books from class for you to read together at home.

Here are some of our favourite French books from class for you to read together at home.

Here are some of our favourite German books from class for you to read together at home.

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Giveaway and Review of Babi Bach CD

Babi Bach CDA few weeks ago I told you about Penni’s brilliant bilingual Welsh and English CD in the blog Babi Bach the 1st FULLY bilingual album in English and Welsh.

You’ll be pleased to hear we have one to giveaway this week.

Here’s what Penni says about the album…
The album has 12 very well known children’s nursery rhymes and songs which are all sung in both languages. Where necessary I have written or updated lyrics so that the English and Welsh versions are exactly the same to make it easier for learners to understand the songs.
It is a very well known fact that music aids memory and learning and so it is a great idea to use music to help your language learning.
The songs have been given a fresh sound with the arrangements by the super talented Darren Fellows. My experiences as a parent have taught me that if the music is of a high quality then you don’t mind quite so much when your little one asks you to repeat the CD for the 10th time that day! 😉 I have been told by parents that their children have been listening to the CD on repeat for ages – I can only hope the adults aren’t going completely crazy!

Here’s what we say…

We’ve been traveling a lot this week and listening to the Babi Bach CD in the car. Us grown ups only knew the Welsh we’d read on road signs and the children did not know any Welsh before listening to the CD. This did not stop them enjoying the CD and joining in when they could. They really enjoyed the dialogue between the singers in between the songs.

The album is a very lively and interactive and we all picked up a bit of Welsh. As a parent I know children’s CD’s can get irritating. In our experience this CD can be listened to over and over again.

If you want to buy your own copy you can here.

If you’d like to win one you can here.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

Babi Bach the 1st FULLY bilingual album in English and Welsh

At Lingotastic we love family language learning. We also get very excited when we hear of people encouraging family language learning. This week we are really lucky to have an interview with the amazing Penni from Babi Bach. She’s an amazing mum who saw that there was a need for Welsh resources and set about meeting that need.

penni

Hi Penni, can you tell me a little about yourself and your family?
I am a wife to Andrew and Mummy to William (aged 5) and Martha (aged 3)
My husband is from Birmingham, England and when we first got married back in 2008 we initially settled in Birmingham. It was after the birth of our son that we decided we wanted to bring our family up by the sea. I am a Barry girl born and bred and so it was a very easy decision where to live!
I was lucky enough to be educated in Welsh medium schools right from nursery through my A Levels so have always enjoyed being bilingual and we decided that we would like our children to have the same gift. Both our little ones attend Welsh school and are doing really well.
When we initially returned to Barry I was really disappointed to find there were no bilingual classes for babies and pre-schoolers and so the idea for Babi Bach was born!
Babi Bach was started in September 2013 and has grown every term! We offer bilingual music classes for little ones and their families. It is an opportunity to introduce two languages to your little one from birth and also to help families who may wish to learn, or re-discover, Welsh with their child. It is a wonderful bonding experience.
I soon realised that there was a need for more bilingual resources in English and Welsh for families and so decided to make the 1st FULLY bilingual album in English and Welsh EVER! I raised part of the funds through the crowd funding platform Kickstarter and have well known Welsh artists lending their talents on the album. These include; Caryl Parry-Jones, Llinos Lee and former member of Only Men Aloud Hugh Strathern.

Babi Bach CD

How does your Album help family language learning?

The album has 12 very well known children’s nursery rhymes and songs which are all sung in both languages. Where necessary I have written or updated lyrics so that the English and Welsh versions are exactly the same to make it easier for learners to understand the songs.
It is a very well known fact that music aids memory and learning and so it is a great idea to use music to help your language learning.
The songs have been given a fresh sound with the arrangements by the super talented Darren Fellows. My experiences as a parent have taught me that if the music is of a high quality then you don’t mind quite so much when your little one asks you to repeat the CD for the 10th time that day! 😉 I have been told by parents that their children have been listening to the CD on repeat for ages – I can only hope the adults aren’t going completely crazy!

Is there anything else you’d like to tell our readers?
If you’d like to find out more about us and out classes check out Babi Bach

The album is currently available for download through most major sites including Amazon
and Spotify. CDs can be ordered directly from myself (info@babibach.co.uk) and in some South Wales shops.
CDs will also be available shortly through Siop Mabon a Mabli online.

Singing four languages in forty minutes.

Yesterday as a family we went along to a multicultural, multinational event called Go Fest.

As a family we think it is very important for our children to see and experience different cultures.
We went along to a multicultural concert by Resonance
Resonance

In forty minutes we had learned and sung along in Farsi, Hindi, Bemba and Urdu. My young girls were soon singing along and shaking their shakers. They loved the Indian drum and handheld Indian cymbals. We found a few phrases we recognised like “Jai Ho” There was a lot of repetition of phrases which really helped us pick the songs up quickly. Us older ones had a lot of fun as well!

One of the group, Rob Baker is an Ethnomusicologist. He studies music in it’s cultural context and spent a long time in West Africa capturing local music and helping people compose songs in their own language. Exciting stuff!

Music is a brilliant way to engage with other cultures and languages. Is there an event you know about your family can join in? Let us know how it goes!

Resonance
run song writing workshops encouraging groups to write songs in their native language and so strengthen their cultural identity. The band are from Singapore, Britain, Italy and Germany. Some of the band members have spent a lot of time in Mali and Tibet and so studied the culture and music of the countries.

Interview with Kristin Hellberg from Bilingual By Music

As a family we’ve found it difficult to find good language learning resources, so over on our
resources page. we’ve compiled lots that we’d recommend. These resources were created as individuals realised there was a need and that they were able and willing to meet that need. There are inspiring stories behind all of the resources and this time we hear the story of Kristin Hellberg, Founder of Bilingual By Music.

elibbm1

Hi Kirsten. Could you tell me little about yourself and your family?

I was born in Sweden but moved to London at age 19 to study Musical Theatre. I started working as a performer and appeared in various West End shows as well as doing voiceovers and TV. I went on to do a BSc in Psychology followed by a MSc in Business Psychology.

Both me and my husband are Swedish, so its very natural for us to have Swedish as the Family language at home. It’s also important to us that we can talk to our 3 kids in Swedish, since that is our ‘emotional’ language.

We live in London and the children go to English speaking schools, they are very much exposed to English every day. We try our best to “promote” Swedish and Sweden to them as much as possible. Its not always easy though. We often find that they speak English with each other when they play together on their own for example.

How does your product help family language learning?

I think music can be a fantastic tool in language learning. Music has rhythms, structures and rules just like languages. Language learning involving music can be a fun way of repeating words and understanding concepts. Its also a great way of remembering new words. The songs on our Swedish-English album are songs that are sung in both the UK and Sweden, so families already recognise the tunes. I think its lovely to point out the similarities between the countries and cultures. We are currently working on a Swedish-English Christmas album which should be ready in time for Christmas 2015. On a sunny day this week we went to record “Let it snow”!

Is there anything else you’d like to tell those reading our blog?

I think its absolutely fascinating and I really enjoy reading about bilingualism and how it all works. There is so much interesting research that is being done as well and Twitter and Facebook is a great way of finding references and ideas.

Try to expose yourself and the children to the minority language as much as you can. Read books, listen to music and songs, watch films, use playful apps. Also try to embrace the culture, which for Swedes would include Midsummer, Lucia playing traditional games such as ‘Bro Bro Breja’ and enjoy the Swedish food traditions such as Semlor, våfflor, leverpastej etc.

Bilingual by music kids song swedish and english illustrated by asa wikman 2 © asa wikman

If you fancy learning some Swedish or Danish, Kristin at Bilingual By Music has produced some gorgeous bilingual CDs with familiar songs. You’ll be singing along in no time… I’ve a few Swedish speaking mummies who rave over these CDs. They’re also available on ITunes, Spotify and Amazon.

Website: www.bilingualbymusic.com

FB: www.facebook.com/bilingualbymusic

twitter: @bilingualbymu

Five Surprising Places for Language Learning with your Little One

5 surprising places for language learning with your little one
This entry was first posted on July 11, 2014 on the Flash Sticks Blog

la lune

We’re fortunate enough to have a great guest post on the FlashSticks blog today, from Sarah Barrett, of Lingotastic. You might remember Sarah from her post a couple of weeks ago, where she told us all about her language teaching journey.
Sarah’s parent and toddler group, Lingotastic, uses puppets, music and stories to help young children and their families to take their first steps into a second language, in a friendly and welcoming environment.
Today, Sarah tells us about a couple of here favourite stealth language learning ideas for families. Perfect timing just before the weekend.
Enjoy…

playground
1. In the playground
On the swings: Count in the target language whilst pushing your little one. And once they’ve mastered numbers, you can always progress to trying out days of the week, as well as months of the year.
Round the roundabout: Ask your little one if they want to go faster or slower in the target language. My children learned the word nochmal – again – on a roundabout.

Family car trips
2. In the car

Counting: Sometimes simplicity is the most effective way for your children to learn a new language. Count to ten around in a circle in whichever language you choose. My children love this one and it’s a great way to ensure they’ve got their numbers down.
Dictionary games: This one’s great and has never-ending possibilities. Simply select a letter and give a description, then ask your child to guess the word. So, for example, you might say, “the word starts with an “F” and is a cake with fruit in it.”
Listening to music: CDs with songs in the target language are a brilliant tool. Music is a very powerful tool for language learning. What’s great from my experience is that children find themselves singing a song fluently in another language, then they become curious about what the words mean, which is where the real learning comes in.

at home
3. At home

Instructions: Give simple instructions in the chosen language, making it as much as a casual part of your routine as possible. You might say, “Schuhe an! (Put your shoes on!).” At first, you may need to do a little translation, but you’ll find that your child very quickly begins to understand the words in the target language.
Counting: There’s no end to the counting game. And counting when going up and down stairs is a great bit of fun.
Arts and crafts: Craft is good for language learning too. When you are making things together, be sure to point out the vocabulary for colours and whatever other materials you are using or things you’re making together.
Pairs: Matching games are great too. We have a few with pictures and words in the target language.
Reading: It goes without saying that bilingual books are brilliant. Your local Library can rent them from Bright Books, if they don’t have some already.
Online: YouTube has lots of brilliant videos of nursery rhymes and even Peppa Pig in a variety of target languages.
Toys: My children had some brilliant bilingual toys, which sing nursery rhymes and teach simple vocabulary.
FlashSticks: Oh and obviously, as the guys guys at FlashSticks were so kind as to let me throw some words together for their blog, I should mention that FlashSticks are brilliant for reading age children. Stick them around the home and label things. Oh and don’t forget to take pictures while you’re out and about, so you can tweet them at FlashSticks on #FlashSticksFriday.

garden
4. In the Garden

Gardening is a great stealth learning activity. And one we can’t get enough of at home. Simply point and name plants and objects, as you play together.

farm
5. Out and about

Visiting the farm or zoo, naming animals in the target language is a great way to pick up some really useful vocabulary. Supermarkets and shops are also good for naming objects too. In fact, it works anywhere!
The aim of this blog was just to kick off a discussion on stealth language learning tactics that your little ones will love. I’ve put forward some of my favourites, but I LOVE hearing new ideas, so if you’ve got some great ideas that I’ve missed, I’d love to hear about them in the comments below.
As a language learning and teaching enthusiast, I’d love to connect with any like minded teachers and learners. It would be great to meet those with little ones or who work with little ones, so if you’d like to get in touch, let me know in the comments below or you can connect with me on Facebook, Twitter or via email.

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